reflation

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Related to reflate: reflationary, reinflate

reflation

1. an increase in economic activity
2. an increase in the supply of money and credit designed to cause such an increase
References in periodicals archive ?
"To reflate Japan and reform it, Shinzo Abe, prime minister since December 2012, proposed the three 'arrows' of what has become known as Abenomics: monetary stimulus, fiscal 'flexibility' and structural reform," the article explains.
However, it is difficult at this stage to form a clear picture of the medium-term impacts and we currently consider the risk of a downturn in private sector activity as against the potential upside from Government-sponsored public sector works to reflate the economy to be relatively finely balanced."
It looks like the ECB's efforts to reflate the Euro zone will spread to parts of the world outside of the Euro zone.
When interest rates are so low, how could we reflate the economy?
Europe and Japan, two other big blocks of global output will be focused more on trying to export their way out of their problem by using quantitative easing to help reflate their economies.
If we want to reflate the region's economy it is not going to be as a result of public spending alone.
It is expected that all these new policy measures would help to reflate the economy.
Brandywine Global believes the keys for stabilization are for the Fed to delay hiking interest rates--previously expected in September--and China must reflate its domestic economy.
An extremely accommodative monetary policy, which is intended to help reflate the country's economy, has driven down credit spreads and investment returns, while loan demand remains weak, resulting in a challenging operating environment for banks to generate profits.
Tokyo -- A key Japanese central bank business survey has shown that big companies plan to cut spending, clouding the outlook for Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's drive to reflate the economy and spurring calls for more monetary stimulus.
When the Fed embarks, as it has, on a novel strategy to reflate the economy, it's healthy for investors to be skeptical.