reflected ray


Also found in: Medical.

reflected ray

[ri′flek·təd ′rā]
(physics)
A ray extending outward from a point of reflection.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in classic literature ?
These plains are often of a desolate sterility; mere sandy wastes, formed of the detritus of the granite heights, destitute of trees and herbage, scorched by the ardent and reflected rays of the summer's sun, and in winter swept by chilling blasts from the snow-clad mountains.
These relations are important in determining the azimuth [phi] and elevation [lambda] of the reflected ray [??] by the heliostat:
Section 4 mainly includes analysis on finite dimensions diffraction loss as well as study on other key propagation phenomena such as effective reflection, shadowing effect on the reflected ray, divergence, and earth curvature effect.
The incident angle is 15[degrees] - 7 1/2[degrees] = 7 1/2[degrees], and since the angle of reflection is equal to the incident angle, the reflected ray is vertical and is seen by the viewer's eye (effect 'a' in Figure 2).
Key statement: A method for determining the tread depth of a vehicle tire, with the tire being mounted on a vehicle, the tire being rolled over or placed on a measuring station, the tread of the tire being optically sensed transversely to the rolling direction of the tire on at least one measuring line, a ray fan extending from a light source being reflected at the tire surface and a signal of the reflected ray fan being recorded by a sensor, and the signal of the reflected ray fan being evaluated by way of a triangulation method, is characterized in that the signal is recorded in a non-orthogonal manner to the tire surface.
In this situation, a reflected ray is generated and ray tracer calculates the reflection coefficient, according to Step 7, and follows Steps 9-11.
The lens plane is located at z = 2c and rays of light w[m.sub.0] and [m.sub.0][p.sub.0] are the principal incident ray and reflected ray, respectively.
The ray reaches point [P.sub.1] on the pipe surface and the reflected ray represented by vector [V.sub.1] reaches the pipe surface at another point [P.sub.2].
Unsurprisingly perhaps it turned out a smaller replica of the Captain's instrument, with the rack and pinion in line with the reflected ray, and a diagonal flat at the eyepiece position to allow more than 200[degrees] of swivel.