reflexive modernization


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reflexive modernization

the conception (Beck et al., 1994) that: ‘the more societies are modernized, the more agents (subjects) acquire the ability to reflect on the social conditions of their existence and to change them in that way’. Thus one medium of reflexive modernization is ‘knowledge in its various forms – scientific knowledge, expert knowledge, everyday knowledge’. A further implication of reflexive modernization, however, is ‘non-knowledge, inherent dynamism, the unseen and the unwilled’ related to a latent disembedding and re-embedding of industrial society in which ‘one type of scientization undermines the next’. ‘There is growth – of obligations to justify things and of uncertainty. The latter conditions the former. The immanent pluralization of risks also calls the rationality of risk calculations into question’. Thus for theorists like Beck ‘reflexive modernity’ is a mixed blessing. While in some circumstances, burgeoning reflexivity may be ‘emancipatory’ (compare HABERMAS, GIDDENS) in others, the loss of’certainty’ brings an intensifying sense of rootlessness and increased risk (see also RISK SOCIETY; compare POSTMODERNISM), and a possible negation of industrial society.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
References in periodicals archive ?
Consumers have moved from 'modernization of tradition', which characterized the first half of the 20 (th) century to 'reflexive modernization of industrial society'.
Abstract: This paper reflects on the relational impacts of global information and communications technology (ICT), making use of both Buddhist conceptual resources and contemporary theories of network organization, complex systems and reflexive modernization. By addressing a critical circularity that afflicts many current philosophical engagements with ICT, prospects are opened for rethinking both the means-to and meanings-of equity in ways that are responsive to the growth dynamics of a global attention economy entrained with widening gaps of wealth, income, resource use and opportunity.
This book discusses the field, themes, and methods of social work in the context of the second, reflexive modernization as a period of blurring boundaries, particularly that of identity.
(1) Ulrich Beck, "The Reinvention of Politics: Towards a Reflexive Theory of Modernization," in Reflexive Modernization: Politics, Tradition and Aesthetics in the Modern Social Order, ed.
Her proposal for reform rests on three "pillars": (1) most prominently, Beck's concepts of "risk society," "reflexive modernization," and "sub-politics"; (2) communication theory consisting of an uneasy marriage of Habermas and Foucault on discourse ethics and power, along with the organizing potential of Castells' "networked society"; and (3) citizenship theory, the most nebulous pillar, perhaps necessarily so since the forms it may take under reflexive modernity are still emerging.
These formulations of "reflexive modernization" and "risk society" make multiple appearances in this short and eminently readable collection of essays.
The reinvention of politics: Towards a theory of reflexive modernization. In U.
Like the ecological and financial axes of the world risk society, global terrorism is also a product of reflexive modernization. It is the risk of "unnatural, human--made, manufactured" uncertainty and hazards beyond state boundaries and controls, which are unpredictable before they occur.
Reflexive modernization theorizes that such risks will trigger a transformation toward a critically reflexive society in which such risks are minimized (Beck, Bonss, and Lau 2003).
Individual chapters explore topics including risk society and reflexive modernization, culture and risk, governmentality and risk, systems theory and risk, and edgework and voluntary risk taking.
This reflexive modernization is in particular the domain of intellectuals and scholars.
The reinventions of politics: Towards a theory of reflexive modernization. In U.