refusal

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refusal

The depth below which a pile cannot be driven.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Forced compliance," on the other hand, is the alternative to respecting refusal of treatment. Ethical issues come into play: patient rights; respect for autonomy; violations of bodily integrity; power differentials; and gender equality.
Based on the decision in Goliath it appears, if a medical intervention is necessary to protect broader society, that the rights of an individual patient are not grounds for the refusal of treatment. The patient may be forced to undergo treatment against their express wishes, and, as has been explained above, rights may be limited where such limitation serves an important purpose.
In our study, their behaviors changed from the refusal of treatment or crying to being still and overcoming their fear.
In both the groups, the most common reason of nonadherence was refusal of treatment (27%) followed by side effects (27%), forgetfulness (18%), and various combinations in minor percentages.
Insisting that the government will not tolerate refusal of treatment by private hospitals, Jain said they must stabilise the affected persons and make necessary arrangements if there was no availability of bed.
This right to autonomy is, however, restricted to refusal of treatment and requesting palliative treatment to relieve suffering that may have the additional effect of accelerating the dying process--the doctrine of double effect.
Leachate treatment of the EMI and disposal of bottom ash from refusal of treatment are the responsibility of the owner.
The final chapter addresses marginalized youth and complex ethical issues, such as consent and refusal of treatment. Dr.
Mr Maurice Swanson, the Heart Foundation's national spokesman on tobacco control said that the refusal of treatment is not something the foundation would support instead, he said that the attention must shift to the tobacco industry, "that continues to ruthlessly market, promote and make widely available, a lethal and addictive product that kills more than 15,000 Australians every year."
To respect a patient's refusal of treatment or a request to cease treatment is not euthanasia.
(The paramedics neglected to obtain signed refusal of treatment forms.)