Regenerate

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regenerate

[rē′jen·ə‚rāt]
(chemical engineering)
To clean of impurities and make reusable as in regeneration of a catalytic cracking catalyst by burning off carbon residue, regeneration of clay adsorbent by washing free of adherents, or regeneration of a filtration system by cleaning off the filter media.
(electronics)
To restore pulses to their original shape.
To restore stored information to its original form in a storage tube in order to counteract fading and disturbances.

Regenerate

To form, construct, or create anew.
References in periodicals archive ?
productus to regenerate a normal-length cheliped as a function of body size, and we determine the energetic cost of regeneration by comparing growth increments after one molt for regenerating and nonregenerating crabs.
Field and laboratory data indicate that Cancer productus requires at least three instars to regenerate 100% of the normal, contralateral cheliped length.
As chelipeds regenerate, they become more efficient and forceful foraging tools, in part because of changes in their leverage properties.
The length of time required to regenerate a missing limb to normal size can vary dramatically between life-history stages and species of crabs (Juanes and Smith, 1995).
Dr Aboobaker said: "These amazing worms offer us the opportunity to observe tissue regeneration in a very simple animal that can regenerate itself to a remarkable extent and does so as a matter of course.
Planarians are famous for their immense power of regeneration, being able to regenerate a new head after decapitation.
Examination of dissected animals and crab exuviae revealed that this mode of regeneration is produced by continuously generating blastemas at the proximal ends of the previous regenerates.
A study of regenerates emanating from limb transplants with reversed proximodistal polarity in the adult newt.
Our previous study (Kao and Chang, 1996) showed that autotransplantation of claw tissues into the autotomized stumps of crab walking legs can induce the stumps to regenerate claws or chimeras of claw and walking leg.
Such misfortunes have long prompted physicians to dream of restoring damaged or amputated limbs by inducing them to regenerate.
They have decided that to unearth the genes and proteins vital to regeneration, they must study animals that can actually regenerate.
Rather than rely on dedifferentiation, the few human tissues that can regenerate such as blood and the liver--turn to a small number of unspecialized cells set aside during embryogenesis.