regolith


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Related to regolith: peristeronic

regolith

(reg -ŏ-lith) The layer of dust and broken rock, created by meteoritic bombardment, that covers much of the surfaces of the Moon and other planets and satellites in the Solar System.

regolith

[′reg·ə‚lith]
(geology)
The layer rock or blanket of unconsolidated rocky debris of any thickness that overlies bedrock and forms the surface of the land. Also known as mantle rock.
References in periodicals archive ?
Recent work at Nonta has been focused on understanding the distribution of gold in the regolith profile using mapping and various sampling with analysis.
It is so dry that one would need to process more than a metric ton of regolith in order to collect 16 ounces of water.
Two dusty plasma clouds form as a result -- one composed of regolith fragments and a second of hardened droplets of molten material.
Conversely, in landscapes where saline water passing through the regolith is chemically buffered, land salinity may not be apparent but the net salt flux to streams can be high.
Seeing what happens when the surface of the Moon cools quickly will help scientists "understand some of the characteristics of the regolith - the mixture of soil and loose rocks on the surface - and how it changes over time," the US space agency said in a statement.
Lunar landers are exposed to severe lunar thermal environments with a daily surface temperature difference of approximately 300[degrees]C owing to the absence of atmosphere to absorb heat energy and the high absorptivity and emissivity values of lunar regolith [8].
OSIRIS-REx stands for Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security, Regolith Explorer.
The robot has 10 minutes to maneuver over the regolith, traveling from its starting position, through the obstacle area, to the mining area, then returning to deposit the collected regolith (at least 10 kg to qualify) into a collection bin.
The thickness of the outermost lunar shell is approximately 60~65km, the top 1~2km of which mainly consists of lunar regolith and rock fragments [1].
Geared toward undergraduate and graduate student teams, the competition required teams to design and build a mining robot that could navigate a simulated Martian terrain, excavate as much simulated Martian regolith (superficial material covering solid rock) and gravel as possible, and deposit the material into a collection bin.
Strata-I could give us answers about how regolith behaves and moves in microgravity, how easy or difficult it is to anchor a spacecraft in regolith, how it interacts with spacecraft and spacesuit materials, and other important properties.