regolith

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regolith

(reg -ŏ-lith) The layer of dust and broken rock, created by meteoritic bombardment, that covers much of the surfaces of the Moon and other planets and satellites in the Solar System.

regolith

[′reg·ə‚lith]
(geology)
The layer rock or blanket of unconsolidated rocky debris of any thickness that overlies bedrock and forms the surface of the land. Also known as mantle rock.
References in periodicals archive ?
The third survey conducted in Palayakadu indicates greater contamination of regolith at a depth of 0 to 20 m with a resistivity less than 40 Um.
Thick regolith covers point to the presence of an etchplain that became normal-faulted.
Judging from the results of geoelectrical soundings, the thickness of unconsolidated sediments amounts to 600 m, although this figure can also include thickness of regolith covers upon crystalline bedrock (Cwojdzinski and Jodlowski, 1978).
At some places, fully-developed regolith sections are to be observed whereas at others poorly weathered rocks underlie gentle relief, composed of hills and basins formed due to selective, subsurface weathering.
Depth of regolith has very weak relationships with either slope class or landform element individually but there are some clear relationships with combinations of slope class and landform element.
Regolith depth is highly variable both across and down the subcatchment (Fig.
The most common regolith profile of interfluves to midslopes is Loess A over Colluvium A over weathered rock or hard rock.
The regolith stratigraphy supports the description of landscape genesis described by Leslie (1973) at Clark's Junction, except for the evidence found in this study of retention of loess and colluvium from an earlier stadial.