natural abundance

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natural abundance

[′nach·rəl ə′bən·dəns]
(nucleonics)
The abundance ratio of an isotope in a naturally occurring terrestrial sample of an element.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The relative abundance of fungi with the lengthening of storage time and the influence of different additives was compared by heat map analysis at genus level (Figure 4).
In Maribojoc town, fire trees (or flame trees, Delonix regia) which grow in relative abundance were almost all abloom.
Whereas fishery-independent surveys can provide valuable measures of relative abundance to inform stock assessments, one of the hindrances to accurate assessment of shark populations is the lack of fishery-independent surveys that are done on a stock-wide basis.
9, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- An integrated plasma proteomics classifier, which integrates the relative abundance of two plasma proteins with a clinical risk prediction model, can distinguish benign from malignant lung nodules in those at low-to-intermediate risk for cancer, according to a study published in the September issue of CHEST.
In the early-life group, the researchers found fewer genes associated with AMR in samples with higher levels of Bifidobacterium (more than 65% relative abundance) than they did in samples with lower levels (less than 20% relative abundance).
The average relative abundance of UMIDs from each probe was determined for patients yielding grossly positive read counts.
Researchers identified a correlation between bluefin tuna body condition, the relative abundance of large Atlantic herring, and the energetic payoff resulting from consuming different sizes of herring.
Walnut consumption resulted in higher relative abundance of three bacteria of interest: Faecalibacterium, Roseburia, and Clostridium.
Walnut consumption resulted in a higher relative abundance of three bacteria of interest: Faecalibacterium, Roseburia, and Clostridium.
In a report prepared by Andrea Azcarate-Peril, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Medicine at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, RP-G28 modified the relative abundance of 28 bacterial species.