relative force

relative force

[′rel·əd·iv ′fȯrs]
(engineering)
Ratio of the force of a test propellant to the force of a standard propellant, measured at the same initial temperature and loading density in the same closed chamber.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Men were shown to have significantly greater relative force with both CP (P<0.
Comparative chart with the duration of contact in initial testing and final testing Comparative charts of relative force (forces F) in beat contact and force-power of impulse (Gradient dF/dt).
The strategy expected to be articulated in the 2014 Quadrennial Defense Review--and particularly the "pivot to the Pacific"--will determine relative force sizes of the services.
The results of this study showed that swimmers with higher relative force values were able to be faster on 10m-mark then the swimmers with lower relative force values.
However, today it is possible to precisely measure the relative force of each occlusal contact, the timing of the oc- clusal contacts and specific muscle contraction levels, all simul- taneously.
As Woodland succinctly and cogently sums up his generally painstaking thesis: "It is a question of the relative force with which Stevens respectively adopts and questions the apocalyptic mode" (126).
Not all of the elements of the scorecard are equally important, and the validity and relative force of the abundant linkages remains speculative.
stress In prosody, the relative force or prominence of a syllable in a verse.
The Canadian researchers, by contrast, measured the effect of insoles on actual runners: they had subjects run across a sensitized platform that registered the relative force of impact on their feet.
Research goals to identify the absolute and relative force of the muscles of the arms and legs and the level of achievement of the effectiveness of kinetic extrusion shot put for the second phase of students for the academic year 2014-2015.
but a lot to do with the relative force applied to them.

Full browser ?