relativistic electron

relativistic electron

An electron moving at close to the speed of light. The special theory of relativity must be used to describe associated phenomena.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
It came back unexpectedly about two millennia later under the guise of the Zitterbewegung or trembling motion of the relativistic electron that Erwin Schrodinger discovered in Dirac's theory of electrons and positrons.
In addition to this radiation zone, the craft found particles in the relativistic electron radiation belt that have never been observed before and that researchers don't understand as of now.
Soon after Dirac presented his relativistic electron theory, (6,7) O.
Maraghechi, "Wave-mode dispersions in a relativistic electron beam with ion-channel guiding," Physics of Plasmas, vol.
In this paper, the authors study a relativistic electron coupling to a homogeneous magnetic field.
The relations in (1) also lead to the relativistic electron energy E = [square root of ([m.sup.2][c.sup.4] + [c.sup.2][p.sup.2])].
[11] proposed X-ray brachytherapy sources based on the interactions of the relativistic electron beam of DPF with a high-Z target.
Lead author Richard Thorne, a distinguished professor of atmospheric and oceanic sciences in the UCLA College of Letters and Science, and his team's analysis reveals that scattering by intense, natural very low-frequency radio waves known as "chorus" in the Earth's upper atmosphere is primarily responsible for the observed relativistic electron build-up.
The Lagrangian function for the relativistic electron motion, expressed in Cartesian coordinates ([bar.r] = x[??] + y[??] + z[??]), is [20]
If we supply energy to this relativistic electron, its speed cannot increase (possibly only its wavelength decreases) and any acceleration will be zero.
R., "Particle-in-cell simulations of azimuthal instabilities in relativistic electron layers," Phys.

Full browser ?