release point


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release point

The point on the ground directly above which the first parachutist, cargo, or ordnance is dropped.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
Getting the salmon to the release point involved a number of organizations.
Next, the probability of contamination, or, the chance that a particle could travel from the aerosol release point to a given distance in the main corridor, was calculated for each particle size and ventilation mode (Table 3).
It doesn't land until the ball arrives at the release point.
With this sensitivity to release point and draws the papermakers are very aware of changes and how to react to them.
* Establish a communications node between the release point and the ISB.
One significant difference in the use of precision-guided versus dumb ordnance is the greater array of release points that can be used with the former to hit a particular target.
It then adjusts the calculated pitch's parameters, such as the spatial coordinates of the release point and the spin rate, according to a scheme aimed at minimizing the difference between the plotted trajectory and that of the videotaped original.
If the release point of your magazine is not the same, you will probably have problems feeding 185 gr.
The task was modified by adding four release points marked on curve stands, four adjustable heights, four different weights, three specific distances (which were marked on the board), and a target, designed specifically to identify children's thinking about four variables: 1) release point (i.e., angle of release of the bob), 2) height (i.e., the length of the pendulum string), 3) weight (i.e., mass of the pendulum bob), and 4) distance (i.e., from the center of the bob to the target).
Sometime within the subsequent 6 weeks, this mouse returned to the house from the 1,000-m release point and then from 750 m and 1,200 m away on consecutive days within our 3-day trapping period.
The strategy adopted in these experiments was to ask questions of the form: 'can an umpire take account of variations in parameter P when making an LBW decision?' For example, variation in the position of the release point of the ball may or may not cause corresponding biases in the umpire's decisions.