Relict


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Related to Relict: mesophyte, Sclerophyllous

relict

1. Ecology
a. a group of animals or plants that exists as a remnant of a formerly widely distributed group in an environment different from that in which it originated
b. (as modifier): a relict fauna
2. Geology
a. a mountain, lake, glacier, etc., that is a remnant of a pre-existing formation after a destructive process has occurred
b. a mineral that remains unaltered after metamorphism of the rock in which it occurs
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Relict

(rel -ikt) A Soviet space mission launched in 1983 that made the first measurement of dipole anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Relict

 

an animal or plant species that exists in a given country or region as a remnant of the flora and fauna of past geological ages and that in some way is anomalous with regard to present-day conditions of existence. Relicts are identified by their ties to the plant and animal world of past ages or to definite types of vegetation. Thus, species that have been preserved without visible changes at least since the Pliocene are called Tertiary or, more correctly, Neogenic relicts.

In Colchis there are a number of remnant tree species (wing nut, zelkova, chestnut) and evergreen shrubs. The ironwood is a relict in the Talysh Mountains, and the muskrat is a relict in the Volga and Ural basins. Forest relicts in the arctic are species that advanced far to the north during the warm interglacial age and stayed there surrounded by tundra (twinflower, whortleberry, certain wintergreens). Glacial relicts are plants and animals that have survived from the ice age on a given territory.

Plant and animal species that have been preserved only in certain sectors of formerly large ranges and in this sense resemble relicts are called pseudorelicts.

A. I. TOLMACHEV

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

relict

[′rel·ikt]
(biology)
A persistent, isolated remnant of a once-abundant species.
(geology)
Referring to a topographic feature that remains after other parts of the feature have been removed or have disappeared.
Pertaining to a mineral, structure, or feature of a rock which represents features of an earlier rock and which persists in spite of processes tending to destroy it, such as metamorphism.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Besides being incongruent with the regional vegetation, these grasslands have gained special attention because they have been declared or suggested to be either relicts or analogues of vegetation that existed in unglaciated Beringia during the last 2000 years of the Late Wisconsinan (e.g., Lausi and Nimis, 1985; Edwards and Armbruster, 1989; Yurtsev, 2001; Swanson, 2006; Berman et al., 2011; Conway and Danby, 2014).
Previous genetic studies in Relict gull used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and a nuclear gene to reveal structure and it was suggested that more effective molecular markers were needed to fully address the relationship among different subpopulations (Yang et al., 2015).
Sequences below, particularly those indicative of relict plant material, suggest that the diminished sequence yield from the indigenous population is dampened by such signals and make detailed conclusions about an indigenous community more tenuous.
We hypothesize that the recent disjunct range is a relict of a wider glacial distribution.
"By the 2020s, the gas cycling will have touched most of the relict and residual oil.
"A relict is like you, Uncle Ed, a remnant of an otherwise extinct organism," Keith says.
By contrast, our investigation of a sugarberry-cedar elm-pecan forest along the Bosque River emphasized the understory of the relict vegetation (Daubenmire, 1968) of this natural area (Helms, 1998) because these vegetational layers were of obvious value for grazing and browsing animals, constituting forest range or grazable woodland (Bedell, 1998).
The Boreal Owl as a Pleistocene relict in Colorado.
THE doughty and many-talented Clarissa Dickson Wright, that large cook now the relict of BBC's Two Fat Ladies, has never struck me as a retiring woman.
He now edits an on-line refereed journal, The Relict Hominoid Inquiry (www.isu.edu/rhi) examining the global phenomenon of relict “wildmen”.