relict soil

relict soil

[′rel·ikt ′sȯil]
(geology)
A soil formed on a preexisting landscape but not subsequently buried under younger sediments.
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References in periodicals archive ?
A buried soil, relict soil, or exhumed soil may have been subjected to hundreds, thousands, or millions of years of exposure and to a variety of pedologic changes, including a number of different climatic conditions.
Buried, exhumed, and relict soils delineate ancient surfaces that may have undergone weathering processes for long periods.
i) Relict soils, which have remained on the current land surface since the rime of initial formation but do not necessarily reflect the processes forming today's soil;
The Mediterranean countries thus contain a mosaic of old, even relict soils beside recently-formed soils with well-defined characteristics.
In the alluvial system of the Condamine valley, relict soils were recognised by Beckmann and Thompson (1984).