Remorse

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Related to remorsefulness: compunctious

Remorse

See also Regret.
Ayenbite of Inwit (Remorse of Conscience)
Middle English version of medieval moral treatise, c. 1340. [Br. Lit.: Barnhart, 74]
Deianira
commits suicide out of remorse for unwittingly having killed husband, Hercules. [Gk. Myth.: Benét, 709]
Hermione
commits suicide upon the funeral pyre of her beloved Pyrrhus for having instigated his murder. [Fr. Drama: Racine Andromaque]
Jocasta
commits suicide when she realizes she has married son, Oedipus. [Gk. Lit.: Oedipus Rex]
Lord Jim
tormented by his memory of having saved himself from a sinking ship with 800 Muslims aboard. [Br. Lit.: Joseph Conrad Lord Jim in Magill I, 522]
Manfred
magician, living alone in an Alpine castle, broods on his alienation from mankind and on his destruction of the woman he loved. [Br. Poetry: Byron “Manfred”]
Mannon, Orin
crazed by guilt for inciting mother’s suicide. [Am. Lit.: Mourning Becomes Electra]
Oedipus
blinds self upon learning of his crimes. [Gk. Lit.: Oedipus Rex]
Othello
commits suicide from guilt for wife’s murder. [Br. Lit.: Othello]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
remorsefulness, given that he had attempted to minimize his own moral
At the same time, the vast majority of the boys felt that making a girl pregnant was morally wrong and they expressed remorsefulness and conflicting feelings about this, both for the girl and for themselves:
Within this specifically English context, Taylor's critical stance combines the brash iconoclasm of an Angry Young Man and the bittersweet remorsefulness of a Young Fogey.
So did Bernard Shaw, who believed throughout his life that the Life Force was helping to breed the Superman, "omnipotent, omniscient, infallible, and withal completely, unilludedly self-conscious: in short, a God." Even Chekhov frequently urged his weakly characters, most of whom identified themselves with Hamlet in their remorsefulness, nervourness and vacillation, to refrain from self-flagellation and "get some iron in your blood."
Although he succeeded in killing Naboth, but the wrath of God did not spare his family despite his remorsefulness.
Children believe that "one forgives with time", while parents point to reasons such as "remorsefulness and forgiving the other person" and "legal justice".