remote invocation


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remote invocation

To cause a program to be launched on a remote server. See RMI.
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Although the performance of the CSwPG solution is close to the SS's (around 35% worse), the instantiation time and complexity of the CSwPG architecture makes us consider using it only in environments where it is needed (remote invocation and distributed bundles), which leaves the SS solution as the best default option and specifically for systems with limited resources or where performance becomes a key factor.
College-level libraries strong in Java programming guides need NEXT GENERATION JAVA TESTING: unlike many Java programmer's guides, it provides a pragmatic discussion for Java developers interested in building stronger code for applications, and packs in chapters discussing testing methods, tradeoffs associated with testing, applications of testing theory and rules, analysis of partial failures and remote invocation, and more.
Remote invocation is the creation of a process on a remote node.
This strategy is convenient for remote invocation strategies [Eager et al., 1986a; Krueger and Livny, 1987b; Agrawal and Ezzat, 1987].
Latency might become a major concern here because transparency can only be effective if the time taken by a remote invocation is similar to that of a local invocation.
Two more sophisticated techniques might be considered to extend the basic remote invocation mechanisms: retry behind the scenes or replication.
Remote invocation comes in two flavors: synchronous and asynchronous (where asynchrony leads to truly parallel execution of client and server).
Transparent remote invocation is achieved with a simple communication model which uses the CHORUS communication primitives and protocols.
However, total transparency is not desirable: a few distribution-related features are required to take full advantage of distribution and to tune performance (e.g., to keep related objects close together to avoid remote invocation), but their use can be deferred to a late implementation (preinstallation) phase.
Both of the methods take a single argument, a claim[underscore]number, which is returned by the corresponding remote invocation as a handle to obtain the actual result in the future.
The presence of the ORB enables both in-process and remote invocations, by both clients and objects in the executable module.
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