render


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render

History a payment in money, goods, or services made by a feudal tenant to his lord

render

1. To give a mechanical drawing, as in elevation, a more or less complete indication of shades and shadows; in ink, color, or other media.
2. To apply plaster directly to brick-work, stonework, tile, etc.; esp. to apply the first coat.

render, float, and set

Three-coat plastering executed directly on stone or brick.

render

(1) To make visible; to draw. The term comes from the graphics world where a rendering is an artist's drawing of what a new structure would look like. In computer-aided design (CAD), a rendering is a particular view of a 3D model that has been converted into a realistic image. It includes basic lighting such as Gouraud shading as well as more sophisticated effects that simulate shadows, reflection and refraction. It may also include the application of textures to the surfaces. See Gouraud shading, Phong shading, texture mapping and rapid prototyping.

(2) To convert any coded content to the required format for display or printing. Although the term is typically used to refer to images, it may refer to any data. For example, an HTML page, which contains text and graphics, is said to be "rendered" when it is displayed.


A Bentley Rendering
Photorealistic pictures require high-end rendering software. This drawing of downtown Philadelphia was rendered in MicroStation MasterPiece from Bentley Systems. (Image courtesy of Bentley Systems, Inc.)







A Pixar Rendering
Pixar's sophisticated RenderMan software was used to simulate water in this example. (Image courtesy of Pixar Animation Studios.)
References in classic literature ?
Fortunately, he gave his discourses somewhat of the progressive character of lectures, leading his listeners on, as it might be step by step, in a way to render all easy to the commonest understanding.
The dress of this individual was a mixture of the coarsest vestments of a husbandman with the leathern garments, that fashion as well as use, had in some degree rendered necessary to one engaged in his present pursuits.
Let us add that his deafness rendered him to some extent dumb.
Commerce, contributing to both these objects, must of necessity render the payment of taxes easier, and facilitate the requisite supplies to the treasury.
``three quarts of double ale had rendered thee as free as thy master, ay, and freer too, if he be a Saxon like thyself.''
Giving his wife a hearty kiss, and Nicholas a no less hearty shake of the hand, John mounted his horse and rode off: leaving Mrs Browdie to apply herself to hospitable preparations, and his young friend to stroll about the neighbourhood, and revisit spots which were rendered familiar to him by many a miserable association.
By enlarging too much the number of electors, you render the representatives too little acquainted with all their local circumstances and lesser interests; as by reducing it too much, you render him unduly attached to these, and too little fit to comprehend and pursue great and national objects.
Literally "not to call them thine," but the Greek may be rendered "In order not to reveal thine."
And at once, without leaving the church, thanks were rendered to the Creator for His help and for the victory.
But the telescope of the Rocky Mountains, before doing its duty to the Gun Club, rendered immense services to astronomy.
Have I had nothing more important to remember, in the great service you rendered me that day?"
The word is strongly expressive in their language, but not easily rendered into English; it signifies, "to retire to his first mother." Her excuse for not coming sooner, was, that her husband dying late in the morning, she was a good while consulting her servants about a convenient place where his body should be laid; and I observed, she behaved herself at our house as cheerfully as the rest.