render

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render

History a payment in money, goods, or services made by a feudal tenant to his lord

render

1. To give a mechanical drawing, as in elevation, a more or less complete indication of shades and shadows; in ink, color, or other media.
2. To apply plaster directly to brick-work, stonework, tile, etc.; esp. to apply the first coat.

render, float, and set

Three-coat plastering executed directly on stone or brick.

render

(1) To make visible; to draw. The term comes from the graphics world where a rendering is an artist's drawing of what a new structure would look like. In computer-aided design (CAD), a rendering is a particular view of a 3D model that has been converted into a realistic image. It includes basic lighting such as Gouraud shading as well as more sophisticated effects that simulate shadows, reflection and refraction. It may also include the application of textures to the surfaces. See Gouraud shading, Phong shading, texture mapping and rapid prototyping.

(2) To convert any coded content to the required format for display or printing. Although the term is typically used to refer to images, it may refer to any data. For example, an HTML page, which contains text and graphics, is said to be "rendered" when it is displayed.


A Bentley Rendering
Photorealistic pictures require high-end rendering software. This drawing of downtown Philadelphia was rendered in MicroStation MasterPiece from Bentley Systems. (Image courtesy of Bentley Systems, Inc.)







A Pixar Rendering
Pixar's sophisticated RenderMan software was used to simulate water in this example. (Image courtesy of Pixar Animation Studios.)
References in periodicals archive ?
Creating a renderable surface also takes a long time compared to heighfield methods [18].
The ability to set any MPEG file as a Master Clip allows any MPEG file to be Smart Renderable. The Master Clip can also be used to re-encode other MPEG video clips to the Master Clip's specifications; this is useful for encoding video for devices such as smartphones, where the video specifications are not always well documented--all the user needs is a video clip known to work on the device.
Several methods are available to deal with an unknown composed character sequence that is outside of a fixed, renderable set (see Figure 5-8).