renounce

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Related to renouncers: renunciation, sannyasin, Sannyasa

renounce

Rare a failure to follow suit in a card game
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
In the words of Wijayaratana (172), "did they not necessarily become renouncers in the very moment they became Arahants?
The debates between Brahmins and shramans (renouncers) of the Buddhist and Jain traditions dramatized another, central issue--viz., whether non-violence is ever possible for living beings including humans?
The extension of the partible inheritance will be established in accordance with the heirs who are entitled to a portion of an inheritance that come effectively to the inheritance, not being unworthy or renouncers. For example, if the defunct has three children, but there are only two that can and wish to come to the inheritance, their partible inheritance will be of 2/3 from the inheritance (calculated in accordance with the children that effectively would have come to the inheritance) and not 3/4 from the inheritance (as in the case that would have come to the inheritance all the three children).
May Alexander Solzhenitsyn, one of the world's greatest renouncers of lies, rest in peace.
Heimbach says that the statement "threatens to undermine Christian moral witness in contemporary culture by dividing evangelicals into renouncers and justifiers of nebulous torture--when no one disagrees with rejecting immorality or defends mistreating fellow human beings made in the image of God." Erin Roach, Ethicist: NAE Torture Declaration 'Irrational,' BAPTIST PRESS, Mar.
These range from the gentle asceticism and "creative frugality" commended by Jay McDaniel and the householder disciplines mentioned by Jeffery Long to the extreme austerities of some Hindu and Jain renouncers noted by Ramdas Lamb and Christopher Chapple.
Hijras come into their selves, as it were, "through constructing their individuality as renouncers, and the medium or currency through which they construct their individuality is izzat (respect).
Sati-narratives are told in ancient and medieval Jain texts and are among the most popular and widely known of Jain literature among renouncers and laity in both of the main Jain sects, Svetambar and Digambar.
This first chapter also recounts the origin and development of female renouncers in the Buddhist traditions of South and South East Asia, a movement which had a profound affect on the development of the Theravada movement in Nepal.
The ongoing transactional relationship between renouncers and laity is investigated in terms of the gifting of food to the renouncers among the Svetambar Murtipujak Jams.