repeater


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repeater

1. Electrical engineering a device that amplifies or augments incoming electrical signals and retransmits them, thus compensating for transmission losses
2. Nautical one of three signal flags hoisted with others to indicate that one of the top three is to be repeated
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

repeater

[ri′pēd·ər]
(electricity)
(electronics)
An amplifier or other device that receives weak signals and delivers corresponding stronger signals with or without reshaping of waveforms; may be either a one-way or two-way repeater. Also known as regenerator.
An indicator that shows the same information as is shown on a master indicator. Also known as remote indicator.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

repeater

(networking, communications)
A network or communications device which propagates electrical signals from one cable to another, amplifying them to restore them to full strength in the process. Repeaters are used to counter the attenuation which occurs when signals travel long distances (e.g. across an ocean).

A network repeater is less intelligent than a bridge, gateway or router since it works at the physical layer.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

repeater

(1) A communications device that amplifies (analog) or regenerates (digital) the data signal in order to extend the transmission distance. Available for both electronic and optical signals, repeaters are used extensively in long distance transmission. They are also used to tie two LANs of the same type together. Repeaters work at layer 1 of the OSI model. See bridge and router.

(2) The term may also refer to a multiport repeater, which is a hub in a 10Base-T network.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Chapter Two: Quantum Repeater Status and Technical Evolution
The role of repeater F waves in UMN lesions has not been fully evaluated because previous studies have compared patients with normal subjects and have mostly employed 10-20 supramaximal stimuli to obtain F waves so far.
Major repeaters (individuals with >5 lifetime suicide attempts) represent approximately 10% of all suicide attempters (Barnes, 1986; Bille-Brahe et al., 1996; Kreitman and Casey, 1988).
Powered by the existing base-station power supply, the repeater has an internal battery backup which will last approximately two days (10 minute transmitter rate, with 16 transmitters, l0mW output) in the event of a total power failure.
YARMOUTH: 2.20 Agerzam, 2.50 Press Room, 3.20 Aseela, 3.50 Darkening, 4.20 Repeater, 4.50 Openly, 5.20 Saloomy.
The younger horses receive a stone from their elders and if Repeater does improve for the test of stamina, he is no forlorn hope.
"This repeater provides a real boost for our bases in the area, allowing them to talk to boats in areas they may never have been able to access before.
This year's EESW challenge was to project manage the planning, design and deployment of an antenna and radio repeater at Pelham Hall, Penallt, to improve coverage of the Wye Valley.
But, as with many new tech products, the demand from industry coupled with technological advances, created a product that now can "talk" for distances of 20 miles, and in some instances are "talking" more than 40 miles without a repeater.
Wired and wireless connectivity solutions developer Hawking Technologies Inc announced on Tuesday it has begun shipping its outdoor Wireless-300N Dual Radio Smart Repeater.
The Repeater automated print and apply system allows users to print and apply one label to the front of a corrugated carton and an identical label to an adjacent side of the same carton.