Repetition

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repetition

Civil and Scots law the recovery or repayment of money paid or received by mistake, as when the same bill has been paid twice

Repetition

The recurrence of rhythmic patterns, forms, or accents that are separated by spaces of repeated formal elements or different forms.

Repetition

 

in psychology, one of the conditions for memorizing and assimilating material.

Repetition of material to be learned improves retention and facilitates the subsequent recall of the material. The distribution of repetition over time is important. It has been established experimentally that there is an optimal relationship between the duration of periods of exercise and pause, which depends on the character and complexity of the assignment and on the individual features of the subject matter. Actively recalling from memory leads to better memorization than simply repeating the material. At the same time, repetition is by its psychological nature only a repeated solution of a certain problem, and the solution never literally repeats the preceding one.


Repetition

 

the term used to designate the degree of pliancy of the piano mechanism when one note is rapidly repeated. A distinction is made between simple escapement action and double escapement action. Simple escapement action allows for the same key or string to be struck six to eight times per second, and double escapement action, approximately 12.

repetition

[‚rep·ə′tish·ən]
(geology)
The duplication of certain stratigraphic beds at the surface or in any specified section owing to disruption and displacement of the beds by faulting or intense folding.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Much like the early studies that linked smoking and cancer, we now have many studies, including our study, suggesting brain pathology linked to repetitive head trauma," said Hirad, who is a M.D.
This study was therefore conducted in order to find the frequency of body focused repetitive behaviours (BFRBs) in medical students and find out the feelings associated before, during and after committing these habits.
"If we dive into the research and look at disordered, unwanted repetitive behaviours as well as nonclinical, nonimpairing repetitive behaviours, they all involve the region of the brain called the basal ganglia, which is involved in motor control," said Ali Mattu, a clinical psychologist who specialises in body-focused repetitive behaviours at Columbia University Medical Center.
Properties on the severe repetitive loss list are eligible for voluntary buyouts or mitigation funds that pay to raise structures to higher elevations.
Figure 1 illustrates that the difficulty of feature matching in a region with repetitive structures is strongly related to the repetitiveness of the feature inside the region.
The relay feedback configuration as shown in figure 3 is first applied to the process to obtain the repetitive excitation signal.
Under its law, a covered injury may be "specific" or "cumulative." A cumulative injury is defined as one occurring as repetitive mentally or physically traumatic activities extending over a period of time, the combined effect of which causes any disability or need for medical treatment.
Repetitive behaviours are not just common in autism - they are also a symptom associated with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), Parkinson's disease and Tourette's syndrome.
Numerous studies have demonstrated significant anti-depressive properties of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Magnetic Stimulation when in patients with Major Depressive Disorder.
Glenday, who works at the Lean Enterprise Academy, UK, and helps businesses make Lean transformations, and Sather, who works in customer supply chain for Kimberly-Clark, demonstrate how large companies can implement Lean Repetitive flexible Supply (RfS) to create a repetitive, fixed, stable plan to improve performance in manufacturing efficiency, quality, and waste and across the whole supply chain, in addition to acquiring lower inventories and higher customer service.
By contrast, few studies have described the effect of passive repetitive stretching in vivo, which is used frequently in clinical rehabilitation settings [7, 10, 11].