reproducer


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reproducer

[¦rē·prə¦düs·ər]
(computer science)
A punched-card machine that reads a punched card and duplicates part or all of its contents by punching another card. Also known as punched-card reproducer.

reproducer

An early tabulating machine that duplicated punch cards.
References in periodicals archive ?
Reasonable pay to the reproducer of the assortment under the obligatory permit observing the way of the assortment, the consumption caused by the raiser in creating it and other significant components, and
At the opposite end of the spectrum, Reproducers are relatively short-lived (decades), they have single (often subterranean) stems with no basal suckers under natural conditions, produce only one cone per plant (at least for females), and rely heavily on sexual reproduction (e.g., E.
We suggest that we present here a minimal structure of a living system (without reproducer) that can be enlarged by adding subsystems respectively functional elements, a possibility Miller (1978) was not very explicit about.
Showing slides of homes owned by a collector and reproducer of 18th-century Swedish antiques, Flores-Vianna said this style resonates strongly with Americans because of its simple, unpretentious and relaxed nature.
These were tortured into form under the uncertain hand of "reproducer" Phil Spector, who was handed the tapes of the January 1969 recording sessions by an uninterested John Lennon and who promptly adorned several of the tracks with precisely the kinds of syrupy orchestrations that it had been the goal of the project to avoid in the first place.
Unlike the innovator, who is prone to experimentation and challenging existing best (or normal) practice, the reproducer is largely reliant upon other firms to develop new knowledge.
Furthermore, they make a distinction between reproducer and innovator firms to label differences among entrepreneurs and the types of organizations they found.
In an evolutionary approach, the continuum from reproducer to innovator is defined by outcomes, not intentions (Aldrich & Kenworthy, 1999).
A three-letter code of ISE produces these apparently dissimilar occupations: Cardiologist, Psychologist, Actuary, Perfumer, Aerial-Photograph Interpreter, and Furniture Reproducer. Finally, a three-letter code of ESI renders the following occupations: Lawyer, Dietitian, Dispatcher, Newscaster, Ferryboat Captain, and Handicapper-Harness Racing (see DHOC; Gottfredson & Holland, 1996).