Reproduce

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Reproduce

To produce a counterpart, image, or copy of the original.
References in periodicals archive ?
An imperative element of the Plant Breeders' Act is the need joined to the general population enthusiasm over the Interest of the business reproducers (Chapter VII).
This classification framework divides the genus Encephalartos (with a focus on South African species) into four different life history types (Persister, Persister/ reproducer, Reproducer/persister and Reproducer), each with a distinctive growth fonn and number of cones produced during a single coning event.
The top category during 2013 was machinery, sound recorder, reproducers and parts', which contributed 48.
This finding is based on India Import Market data of Electrical Machinery, Equipment, Sound Recorders and Reproducers, Television Image and Sound Recorders and Reproducers and its parts of InfodriveIndia.
According to Comack, the concept of racialized policing broadens the focus of study to encompass the role of the police in the wider society, specifically as reproducers of order.
2%); electrical machinery, sound recorders and reproducers (0.
4) More broadly, we might conclude, women's bodies--as reproducers, workers, and candidates--dominated media coverage of the 2012 election.
In addition, the introduction of the culture of human rights, as an interpretative principle of the professional practices to tackle unyielding social attitudes, would prevent journalists from becoming mere reproducers of social prejudices.
1) In her discussion of women and the nation-building enterprise, Nira Yuval-Davis asserts that women basically play two roles: the biological reproducers and the cultural reproducers.
They are incredibly prolific reproducers, about 900 eggs per year, and McKee always has a surplus of worms to sell.
Lionfish are incredibly fast reproducers, and they are all over the place.
At the end of the first chapter, Murphy discusses how Lanyer places mother and daughter before father and son as reproducers of genealogical connection, "focusing on Christ as king and portraying women as his brides" (63).