reproductive toxicity


Also found in: Medical.

reproductive toxicity

[‚rē·prə‚dək·tiv täk′sis·əd·ē]
(medicine)
Adverse effects on the male and/or female reproductive systems caused by exposure to a toxic chemical. It may be expressed as alterations in sexual behavior, decreases in fertility, or fetal loss during pregnancy. Developmental toxicity may also be included.
References in periodicals archive ?
They are known to disrupt hormone function which has been linked to breast cancer and reproductive toxicity.
Second, it cobbles together two very different programs, one aimed at protecting the state's water supplies by placing various obligations on businesses and people within California, and the other aimed at letting people in California know when they are being knowingly exposed to chemicals the state has concluded cause cancer or reproductive toxicity. Yes, that latter obligation falls on businesses located anywhere in the world if their product ends up in California and exposes people to those chemicals.
For example, the European Union has designated n-Propyl Bromide as a Substance of Very High Concern based on reproductive toxicity. N-Propyl Bromide is a category of highly advanced non-chlorinated, non-flammable solvents majorly used as cleaning or degreasing solvent for removing contaminants such as grease, lubricants, and fluxes from metal machining parts.
Reproductive toxicity triggers enormous demands for REACH (EC, 2006) compliance.
The Department of Health acknowledges that continuous direct exposure to these pollutants "may cause cancer, immune system disease, endocrine disruption, reproductive toxicity, congenital malformation and developmental disorders, and many other diseases."
Associated hazards include: acute toxicity (acute lethality at high concentrations only), blood toxicity, immunotoxicity, cardiovascular toxicity, liver toxicity, kidney toxicity, reproductive toxicity, developmental toxicity, and neurotoxicity.
FA has genetic, mutagenic, carcinogenic and certain reproductive toxicity.1-3 Our previous studies showed that acute exposure to FA induced expanded simple tandem repeats (ESTR) mutations in experimental mice.4 FA has been identified as class I carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC).
The OECD reference guideline for reproductive and developmental toxicity, OECD TG 443 (Extended One-Generation Reproductive Toxicity Study), provides an evaluation of reproductive and developmental effects that may occur in offspring as a result of pre-and post-natal chemical exposure as well as systemic toxicity in pregnant and lactating females (OECD 2011).
Similar results can be found in reproductive toxicity studies with [beta]-lapachone, natural compound which has some pharmacological properties similar to usnic acid.
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