RPM

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rpm

(mechanics)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

rpm

Abbr. for “revolutions per minute.”
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

RPM

(operating system, tool)
A Unix package-management system that helps installation of software packages; similar to an install program.

rpm

(2)
rotation per minute
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

RPM

(1) (Revolutions Per Minute) With electric and electronics devices, RPM measures the rotational speed of the motor's spindle. Floppy disks rotate at 300 RPM, while hard disks rotate from 3,000 to 15,000 RPM. CD and DVD platters typically rotate in the range of 2,000-5,000 RPM.

(2) (Revenue Per Thousand) The amount of advertising revenue a website receives for ads on every one thousand page views that it delivers to the public. RPM includes all the ads on the page whether paid by click-throughs or impressions paid in bulk. See pay-per-click, click-through rate, CPA, CPL, CPM and eCPM.

(3) (Remote Patient Monitoring) Analyzing a person's health in the home. It includes stand-alone devices such as blood pressure and glucose monitors, as well as wireless devices that use the patient's home network to keep physicians informed in real time. See healthcare IT.

(4) (Remote Print Manager) Software from Brooks Internet Software, Inc. (www.brooksnet.com) that prints output from IBM mainframes (IBM Z), AS/400s (System i) and Unix, Linux and OpenVMS computers on printers connected to Windows machines via the LPD protocol. It turns a Windows PC into an LPD print server and also transforms output previously destined for wide, green and white striped computer paper to page-sized documents. See LPD.
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References in periodicals archive ?
However, resale price maintenance keeps its unlucky status as a "mortal sin" from the market integration perspective.
Resale price maintenance is frequently used in sectors for which it is legal (e.g., vehicles, drugs, books).
The unlawful use of resale price maintenance schemes by non-monopoly producers does not provide the same precursors as the use of similar restraints by large-scale producers.
(87.) Judge Bork has argued that resale price maintenance ought to be per se legal, see BORK, supra note 77, at 288, as has Judge Posner, see Richard A.
I think it unlikely that Dermalogica will engage in any further proscribed acts of resale price maintenance. I think the pecuniary penalty I have imposed will be adequate to serve the specific deterrent purpose (the general deterrent purpose is not significantly furthered by grant of an injunction).
It has been estimated that the system of Resale Price Maintenance, set up in the 1970s, costs consumers pounds 300million a year.
Consumer groups and Federal regulators have argued that setting minimum prices--a practice known as resale price maintenance (RPM)--is anti-competitive and means consumers will pay more for goods.
A new survey reveals substantial cross-party support for protecting local pharmacies from the possible abolition of resale price maintenance (RPM) on non-prescription medicines, as sought by the Office of Fair Trading (OFT).
Supreme Court cases and justice department investigations and guidelines, for example, to clarify monopolization attempts by Microsoft, the software giant (resulting in a consent decree); examine price-fixing arrangements (the National Collegiate Athletic Association was found in violation); review merger guidelines (including an appendix on the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index, a methodology for evaluating market concentration useful in merger evaluations by the federal government); and illustrate illegal vertical price restraints that involve resale price maintenance strategies employed by manufacturers against retailers of their products.
The prospects for "wink and nod" resale price maintenance are not hard to appreciate.