resist


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resist

a substance used to protect something, esp a coating that prevents corrosion
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

resist

[ri′zist]
(graphic arts)
A protective layer applied to the image, or other parts of a plate, to protect that portion of the metal from the action of an etching bath or a sandblasting operation.
(materials)
An acid-resistant nonconducting coating used to protect desired portions of a wiring pattern from the action of the etchant during manufacture of printed wiring boards.
(metallurgy)
An insulating material, for example lacquer, applied to the surface of work to prevent electroplating or electrolytic action at the coated area. Also known as stopoff.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in classic literature ?
Having taken for granted that there was a foundation in truth for what she herself had heard in her aunt's room, could she reasonably resist the conclusion that there must be a foundation in truth for what Mrs.
They think that, if they should resist, the remedy would be worse than the evil.
You do not resist cold and hunger, the winds and the waves, thus obstinately; you quietly submit to a thousand similar necessities.
God knows he will have temptations enough to assail him, both from within and without, when I have done all I can to render vice as uninviting to him, as it is abominable in its own nature - I myself have had, indeed, but few incentives to what the world calls vice, but yet I have experienced temptations and trials of another kind, that have required, on many occasions, more watchfulness and firmness to resist than I have hitherto been able to muster against them.
But when were that night together, and, as I have said, had gone such a length, I found my weakness; the inclination was not to be resisted, but I was obliged to yield up all even before he asked it.
"No," said Barbicane, "let us stretch ourselves on our sides; we shall resist the shock better that way.
Elinor, Elinor, they who suffer little may be proud and independent as they like--may resist insult, or return mortification--but I cannot.
It is a reasonable and laudable pride which resists such malevolence."
They search her; she resists; they use force--the scoundrels!"
He tried to pull it out, but one way the flesh resisted the barbed lead, and the other way it resisted the feathered shaft.
He endured the hand of the youth-god on the scruff of his neck, after the collar had been unbuckled; but when the hose was turned on him, he resented and resisted. The youth, merely working by formula, tightened the safe grip on the scruff of Michael's neck and lifted him clear of the floor, at the same time, with the other hand, directing the stream of water into his mouth and increasing it to full force by the nozzle control.
After that he resisted no more, and was washed out and scrubbed out and cleansed out with the hose, a big bristly brush, and much carbolic soap, the lather of which got into and stung his eyes and nose, causing him to weep copiously and sneeze violently.