resonance energy

resonance energy

[′rez·ən·əns ‚en·ər·jē]
(physics)
The characteistic energy at which, or very close to which, the amplitude of a resonance phenomenon is greatly enhanced.
References in periodicals archive ?
I will record changes in the Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) signal for oligonucleotides labelled at the 5' and 3' positions with fluorophores upon absorption into protein droplets.
A Forster Resonance Energy Transfer-based tension, or FRET, the sensor was used to monitor the force dynamics during cell movement.
This additional data source enables many exciting applications, such as the easy quantification of Forster resonance energy transfer experiments, or studying environmental parameters.
The main applications of FLIM are studies of molecular interaction by Forster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), biosensing microenvironmental changes and separation of fluorophores with overlapping spectral proprieties.
Moreover, the spectral characteristics including oscillator's strength, dipole moment, ionization potential, resonance energy and the thermodynamic parameters (association constant and Gibb's free energy changes) were investigated.
A common example is composed of several light harvesting base polymers that transfer energy via fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to a reporter dye attached to the polymer.
For the approximation of the resonance energy, it is assumed that the energy of absorbed photon with the wavelength [lambda] is equal to the electrostatic energy of one excited electron with the charge [q.sub.e] in a metal nanoparticle with a linear extension of L
NanoBRET TE uses bioluminescence resonance energy transfer and allows measurement of drug binding to protein targets in real time inside live cells using a simplified experimental protocol.
However, if the barrier has a local quasibound state, as a result of an attractive point impurity, that is, a local potential well, and the particle's energy is equal to the resonance energy, the particle can resonantly pass through the barrier via the local well with a very high probability, which in principle can be as high as unity [9-11].
Chemistry professor Alexis Vallee-Belisle and his coworkers have been manipulating strands of DNA that respond directly to changes in temperature, so that they change shape and generate a fluorescent resonance energy transfer that is detectable as a light signal.
The authors used a special set of fluorescence probes to measure the transfer of the emission energy of one fluorophore to the fluorophore of its related pair in a technique called the Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET).
The great advancement of fluorescence reagents has promoted a host of more complex fluorescence technologies such as fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), time-resolved fluorescence (TRF), fluorescence polarization (FP), fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) etc.

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