resonant line

resonant line

[′res·ən·ənt ′līn]
(electromagnetism)
A transmission line having values of distributed inductance and distributed capacitance so as to make the line resonant at the frequency it is handling.
References in periodicals archive ?
Equation (1) is the simulation of a single water vapor absorption line [5], where N is the number density in molecules/([m.sup.3]), [[omega].sub.j] is the resonant line center frequency in MHz, [g.sub.[alpha]] ([omega],[[omega].sub.j]) is lineshape function performed in the Van Vleck-Weisskopf lineshape function [6].
"In my end is my beginning." That resonant line of T.
One may plot the Hull cutoff parabola, the Hartree resonant line of the [pi]- and [pi]/2 - 1-modes, one of the examined operating points of the SHM ([V.sub.DC] = 11.3kV and B = 0.79T), and a typical operating point for n-mode to confirm the importance of employing the spatial harmonic operation in reducing the required [V.sub.DC] and B values (Fig.
The most resonant line of all is when Danny says to Oz-bound Anthony: "But you'll still only be a Scouser emigrating."
The more grown-up Cleaves speaks through Drinking Days and Sinner's Prayer, which features the resonant line: 'I'm not livin' like I should, I used to be a better man.'
for the sole wretched end of gaining a more striking stanza or a more resonant line." Saba's charge mirrors Auden's indictment of his younger self for espousing in "Spain" a "wicked doctrine...
If observations are obtained at three different frequencies simultaneously, a mm-wave window might yield the low value diagram, and data obtained in the vicinity of a molecular atmospheric resonant line might yield the even higher value diagram.
The lossless resonant line is transparent when n is even, and the input resistance is the termination resistance [R.sub.c], as can be seen by substituting Equation 13 into Equation 17 and using Equation 12.
The poet is surrounded by world and word: "the world around me / Around me are words saying this." To quote the resonant lines of AngloWelsh poet John James, whose 1977 "A Theory of Poetry" shares something of Archeophonics' s combination of urbanity, roughness, and melancholy deadpan: "wherever you turn / you are surrounded by language / like the air." Or, as Gizzi writes: "I wanted out of the past so I ate the air, / it took me further into air." Eating air is, in its simplest sense, breathing; like "the old language," it is also song, as a figure for that which is shared, breathed in and out by ecosystems and humans.
A century ago, on April 2, 1917, during a speech asking Congress to declare war on Germany, Woodrow Wilson delivered one of the most resonant lines in the history of the American presidency:"The world must be made safe for democracy." In 1941, Franklin D Roosevelt and Winston Churchill, in the Atlantic Charter, committed the World War II allies to protect"the right of all peoples to choose the form of government under which they will live." And since then, democratic ideals have been articulated in speeches by every president, Republican and Democratic.
Secondly, in order to reduce self-adsorption, the lines terminating in a heavily populated level, such as resonant lines were avoided.
These lyrics set her traversing often spectral dramas parading with displaced moments and intimacies weirdly transmuted, as if writing them into resonant lines are the means by which to make a recovery.

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