vital capacity

(redirected from respiratory capacity)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

vital capacity

[′vīd·əl kə′pas·əd·ē]
(physiology)
The volume of air that can be forcibly expelled from the lungs after the deepest inspiration.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the future our research will focus on investigating the role of mitochondria in the pathogenesis of human heart diseases and how various comorbidities have repercussion on the human heart tissue and mitochondrial respiratory capacity.
Our results confirmed that respiratory capacity is preserved in both HBC and HCC as these both demonstrated substantial rates of oxidative phosphorylation, which contradicts with earlier widespread understanding that the metabolism of human breast and colorectal carcinomas is prevalently glycolytic.
(2) HBC respiratory capacity severely higher than in adjacent normal breast tissue.
suggest that drugs that target mitochondrial respiratory capacity in PBMCs (such as carnitine palmitoyl transferase) could hold promise as immunotherapeutics and might warrant further study for their ability to alter T cell responses.
Furthermore, it can be stated that smoking reduces the exercise tolerance level and limits physical activity and that regular exercise raises maximum respiratory capacity. In the light of all this information, the volume, duration and the time of exercise is very important in determining the effect of the exercise on melatonin; melatonin can also show a powerful antioxidant effect against oxidative damage in the lungs by reducing free radical damage caused by smoking.
* Physicians should inquire whether ventilatory work requirements exceed the patient's respiratory capacity.
This allowed the determination of basal ATP turnover, maximal respiration, and reserve respiratory capacity. For determination of glycolytic properties, D-glucose at 10 mM, oligomycin at 0.75 [micro]M, and the glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) at 150 mM were added at the same time points.
It appears that age-related loss of lung tissue elasticity and attendant stiffening of the chest wall are the prime factors in reduced respiratory capacity (universally occurring in sedentary individuals).
In a recent study, we showed that BaP treatment induced lung mitochondrial dysfunction including reduced respiratory capacity, altered cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) activity, and decreased mtDNA levels.
For platelets, reserve respiratory capacity and BHI were positively correlated with FDG-PET measures in all brain areas examined.
Mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity is regarded as an important aspect of mitochondrial function and is defined as the difference between basal ATP production and its maximal activity.
Regular exercise increases the size and number of skeletal muscle mitochondria to increase respiratory capacity of the muscle.