Respiratory Muscles

Respiratory Muscles

 

the skeletal muscles that increase and decrease the volume of the thorax during respiration. The main work of the respiratory muscles is done during inspiration, since expiration occurs passively, as a result of the pull of the thoracic walls and the elasticity of the lungs and intercostal muscles. (The internal intercostal muscles and the abdominal muscles participate in labored exhalation.) The diaphragm is the principal muscle used in inspiration, in which the external intercostal muscles also participate. An increased rate of inspiration is promoted by certain muscles of the neck and the superficial muscles of the chest. Also involved in labored respiration are certain muscles of the back and the shoulder girdle.

References in periodicals archive ?
DMD is characterized by progressive weakness and chronic inflammation of the skeletal, heart, and respiratory muscles. Study patients are being treated via intravenous delivery with either CAP-1002 or placebo every 3 months.
'The disease can progress to weakness in the neck and arms, after which the respiratory muscles and muscles of the lower body are affected,' the WHO says.
[30] In obesity, the function of respiratory muscles is impaired from the increased resistance they must overcome and from the reduced capacity of these muscles.
In severe cases, the disorders might involve cardiac and respiratory muscles and lead to death.
Only in the last 15 years [21] it has been presented as a resource for exercising the respiratory muscles.
Upper-limb and neck muscles (upper trapezius, neck flexors and middle deltoid) were assessed using the Oxford scale, owing to their common innervation pathways with the respiratory muscles. The authors found that deltoid and neck flexor strength was associated with extubation failure, but not SBT failure.
The device has two small leads (wires): one that senses breathing and another that stimulates the respiratory muscles to work when irregular breathing is detected.
Maximum inspiratory pressure ([P.sub.Imax]) is the force that respiratory muscles are able to generate during an occlusive manoeuvre at prefixed volume (Hautmann et al., 2000).
The second mode, or 'Breathe Easier' mode, works at the faster frequency of 25Hz, which stimulates the respiratory muscles.
In its advanced stages, it affects respiratory muscles, leading to progressive muscle weakness, dysarthria, dysphagia, and cramps.
These subjective symptoms could be due to limited pulmonary reserve, limited cardiac reserve and increased muscle fatigue involving respiratory muscles. [4] The type of disease may range from mild dyspnoea to severe respiratory failure.