respiratory quotient


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respiratory quotient

[′res·prə‚tor·ē ¦kwō·shənt]
(physiology)
The ratio of volumes of carbon dioxide evolved and oxygen consumed during a given period of respiration. Abbreviated RQ.
References in periodicals archive ?
Barbieri et al., "Resting metabolic rate and respiratory quotient in human longevity," The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, vol.
Based on the volume of oxygen consumed and carbon dioxide produced the respiratory quotient (RQ) was calculated (Table 3).
This is not the primary concern of the investigation; whether anaerobic respiration has occurred or not would be reflected in the value of respiratory quotient obtained.
The respiratory quotient of succulent plant is more than the other plants, On the other hand non-succulent leaf contain more number of living cell but less air space between cells is marked by absence of organic acid thereby reducing the respiration.
Relative to placebo, treatment with the green tea extract resulted in a significant increase in 24 h energy expenditure (EE) (4%; p < 0.01) (Table 1) and a significant decrease in 24 h respiratory quotient (p < 0.001) without any change in urinary nitrogen.
(In this study, caffeine was no better than placebo.) The green tea also altered respiratory quotients, indicating a shift toward more fat burning.
Indirect calorimetry is also useful in calculating respiratory quotients. The respiratory quotient (RQ) is the ratio of [VCO.sub.2] divided by [VO.sub.2].
As work intensity increases, the RER, also referred to as the respiratory quotient (RQ), approaches 1.0.
The respiratory quotient qC[O.sub.2] (Pirt 1975) was calculated as basal respiration (in micrograms of C[O.sub.2] carbon per gram of dry mass per hour) divided by microbial biomass (in micrograms of carbon per gram).
Importantly, EET-A had no effect on oxygen consumption or respiratory quotient in HF diet fed PGC-1[alpha] deficient mice (Table 1).
A study in endurance athletes has shown that L-carnitine supplementation decreases the respiratory quotient (RQ) during a 45-minute cycling exercise--indicating a glycogen sparing effect that is thought to lead to improved performance and a delayed fatigue onset.
After 26 weeks, women who received the multinutrient supplement had significantly lower body weight, body mass index, fat mass, respiratory quotient, and total and LDL cholesterol; and higher resting energy expenditure and HDL levels compared with placebo and baseline levels.

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