care

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CARE

(Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere), nonprofit, nonsectarian federation of agencies devoted to channeling relief and self-help materials to needy people in foreign countries. Organized in the United States (1945) to help war-ravaged Europe, CARE soon expanded its program to include developing nations in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Famous for its "CARE packages" of food and other necessities, CARE in now also involved in population, health care, land management, and small economic activity. It is now an international organization with 10 member countries and headquarters in Brussels.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

care

  1. the work involved in supporting people who, because of physical frailty chronic illness or other forms of incapacity and disability, are incapable of leading an autonomous existence.
  2. other kinds of carework, e.g. in child-rearing (see CHILD CARE) and DOMESTIC LABOUR. This should be distinguished from care in sense 1.
Care in sense 1 operates over a wide range of social relations. A clear dividing line can be drawn between formal and informal care (see Abrams, 1978) as it exists in contemporary industrial societies. Formal care refers to services provided by agents of organization (statutory, voluntary and/or private) to people within clearly defined categories of need. Informal care is personally directed towards certain people who have a social relationship with their carer - usually a family member, and most often a spouse (Parker, 1993), or female relative.

Feminist sociologists (see also FEMINISM) have had a major impact on the understanding of care and caring relationships. They have argued that caring is ‘a gendered concept’ and that women constitute the majority of carers both informally, in the private sphere, and as low-paid care workers (‘care assistants’) in the formal sector (Finch and Groves, 1982; Ungerson, 1987; Lewis and Meredith, 1988). Studies of caring have examined the complex reasons why women care and the particular problems and difficulties they face. Social policies involving decarceration and COMMUNITY CARE, the decline of neighbour-hood and COMMUNITY associated with increasing SOCIAL (and geographical) MOBILITY, have placed an increasing burden on individual women carers. There is some evidence that women are reluctant to enter caring relationships with female relatives but lack viable alternatives (Cotterill, 1994). Recent research using data from the 1980 British General Household Survey has also pointed to the significant contribution made by male carers, particularly men who care for their wives (Arber and Gilbert, 1989).

Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000

care, custody, and control

Describes a standard exclusion in liability insurance policies. Under this exclusion, the liability insurance does not apply to damage to property in the care or custody of the insured, or to damage to property over which the insured is for any purpose exercising physical control.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

CARE

agency devoted to channeling relief to needy people abroad. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 456]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

care

in (or into) care Social welfare made the legal responsibility of a local authority by order of a court
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
To estimate the impact of utilization behaviors on associated costs, we clustered patient-level data derived from the Medicaid Analytic Extract (MAX) claims files based on the utilization of topical fluoride and sealants before restorative care treatment was provided.
Little is known about the factors that impede the utilization of swing beds in CAHs for restorative care and there has been scarce research on the topic.
The fact that he is now enjoying an active life in his 80s, is a tribute to the restorative care at Baginton Fields Hostel.
Thus, preventing the need for restorative care can save money.
Baker DI, Gottschalk M, Eng C, Weber S, Tinetti ME (2001) The design and implementation of a restorative care model for home care.
This includes, among other things, "bringing more people to the table so we can find ways to prevent them from being victimized and revictimized, making sure their abusers are dealt with, and giving survivors an opportunity for restorative care and the more comfortable life they were seeking in the first place," De Lima said.
The use of ART results in comparatively small cavities, and in a high acceptance of preventive and restorative care by children.
Whether promoting health, healing, providing restorative care or spiritual-based comfort care at the end of life, our courage, compassion, and knowledge are powerful tools.
Under a single-payer system, every American would receive a basic health care benefit package that would include comprehensive inpatient and outpatient care, primary care and specialty physician services, emergency medical care, preventive and restorative care, mental health and substance abuse services, dental care, coverage for prescription drugs, home health care, and long-term care.
Restorative care also allows a facility to comply with the Code of Federal Regulations 42 Subpart B, Section 483.25 Quality of Care, which states: "Each resident must receive and the facility must provide the necessary care and services to attain or maintain the highest practicable physical, mental, and psychosocial well-being, in accordance with the comprehensive assessment and plan of care."

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