restricted


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restricted

[ri′strik·təd]
(geology)
Referring to tectonic transport or movement in which elongation of particles is transverse to the direction of movement.
References in periodicals archive ?
The point is, the alternatives are not just restricted stock, but premium options, discount options and indexed options, or shifting equity incentives into bonus plans that can be targeted to measure and more precisely reward business unit performance.
a restricted waste that has been treated to meet California standards;
According to the company, the restricted stock unit awards to be granted to those employees by JDSU are generally comparable to equity awards that JDSU grants to its similarly situated new employees.
Again, the primary limit, which will be the case with most publicly traded companies' stock options and/or restricted stock, is that the company will not be able to transfer these assets to the nonemployee-spouse.
5 million) all received their salary bumps after becoming eligible for restricted free agency.
Stock options in tandem with restricted stock: In this scenario, there is a calculated relationship between the number of options granted and the restricted stock award.
A unique situation arises with respect to restricted interest for a period before December 31, 1982, for a taxable year for which there is also an overpayment before that date.
Restricted Stock Systems also upgraded its flagship 10b5-1 Plan Manager platform to provide its brokerage clients more powerful tools to manage and execute 10b5-1 trading plans.
A used the restricted stock approach by drawing an analogy between partnership interests in LP and the common stock of a private, closely held corporation.
The most restricted destinations are embargoed countries and those countries designated as supporting terrorist activities, including Cuba, Iran, Iraq, Libya, North Korea, Sudan, and Syria.
In that case, the Supreme Court, likening afternoon broadcasts of Carlin's vulgar language to ``a pig in a parlor instead of a barnyard,'' ruled that the broadcasts could be constitutionally restricted to a time period in which children would be unlikely to be listening.