restriction

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restriction

Logic Maths a condition that imposes a constraint on the possible values of a variable or on the domain of arguments of a function

Restriction

 

a limitation on production, sales, and export imposed by monopolies—especially international cartels—to inflate prices and obtain monopoly profits. Restrictions can also be imposed on credit.

What does it mean when you dream about a restriction?

Any form of restriction in a dream often mirrors some frustration in the dreamer’s personal or business life. The dreamer may be imposing restrictions on himself or herself as well as on others.

restriction

[ri¦strik·shən]
(cell and molecular biology)
The degradation of foreign deoxyribonucleic acid by restriction endonucleases capable of recognizing particular patterns of specificity.

restriction

On land, an encumbrance limiting its use; usually imposed for community or mutual protection.

restriction

A bug or design error that limits a program's capabilities, and which is sufficiently egregious that nobody can quite work up enough nerve to describe it as a feature. Often used (especially by marketroid types) to make it sound as though some crippling bogosity had been intended by the designers all along, or was forced upon them by arcane technical constraints of a nature no mere user could possibly comprehend (these claims are almost invariably false).

Old-time hacker Joseph M. Newcomer advises that whenever choosing a quantifiable but arbitrary restriction, you should make it either a power of 2 or a power of 2 minus 1. If you impose a limit of 17 items in a list, everyone will know it is a random number - on the other hand, a limit of 15 or 16 suggests some deep reason (involving 0- or 1-based indexing in binary) and you will get less flamage for it. Limits which are round numbers in base 10 are always especially suspect.
References in periodicals archive ?
After World War I, fear of subversion by Bolshevik influence and European radicalism, and a heightened awareness of national identity, sapped the popular imperialist sentiment encouraged in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries by the American elites and led directly to a revival of restrictionist scholarship; the Quota Laws of 1921, 1924, and 1927; and the National Origins Quota System based on race and identity.
After explaining why state and local restrictionist measures should be preempted, Motomura explains in Chapter Five why subfederal integrationist policies should flourish.
conservative legal thinkers, restrictionists have obtained popular
154) More specifically, the administration has taken the extraordinary measure of suing to enjoin subfederal restrictionist measures on preemption grounds, arguing that these initiatives are preempted by congressional statutes and/or executive enforcement policies.
national territory and its subnational jurisdictions, lawmakers promoting a restrictionist agenda have shifted their focus from national-level policymaking to state and local arenas in the wake of their failed attempts to overhaul the U.
Immigration's proposed economic costs, particularly the idea of non-citizens "taking" benefits from legal permanent residents or natural-born citizens, have been a perennial justification for restrictionist policy.
It involves a campaign by immigration advocacy groups to delegitimize restrictionist organizations like CIS.
Legislators considered a variety of proposals, ranging from the restrictionist to the comprehensive to the generous.
In April 2006, Weekly Standard editor William Kristol mocked the House Immigration Reform Caucus (a group of restrictionist representatives, almost entirely Republican) as the "House Caucus to Return the Republican Party to Minority Status" and called them "yahoos.
According to one historian, Enoch Powell "succeeded in continually manoeuvring Heath and the Conservative Party towards a more restrictionist position".