restrictive condition

restrictive condition

[ri¦strik·tiv kən¦dish·ən]
(genetics)
An environmental condition under which a conditional lethal mutant either cannot grow or shows the mutant phenotype.
References in periodicals archive ?
He said: "Diabetes is a very restrictive condition as a lot of the food and drink I once enjoyed can cause me serious harm.
"We are aware that this is a very restrictive condition, and that is our intention," Madrid's city councillor for sustainable urban development, Jose Manuel Calvo, told AFP.
And this time, it's Dom, who has muscular dystrophy and Enola, who has a growth restrictive condition called Morquio Syndrome, who prepare to find their one true pup.
Now, the less restrictive condition would set a timetable of events, with construction of the store and stadium, the opening of the store and the availability of the stadium for use, dependant on the financing of the stadium.
But after finally approving it, the council slapped on a restrictive condition that the timber-frame bungalow could only remain within Mr Tasker-Brown's immediate family and could not be sold.
Sheriff Ruxton said the "highly restrictive conditions" in which Nobbs was held in Low Moss had "a direct causal connection" with his death.
These unduly restrictive conditions of detention breached Mrs.
In cases of other offenders, judges would have been called upon to order "least restrictive conditions" to assure a return to court.
US nationality comes with a bevy of restrictive conditions: like any American who is born, grows up and dies anywhere in the world, year after year Meghan and Harry's child will have to show the Internal Revenue Service his or her tax status is clean.