result

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result

1. a number, quantity, or value obtained by solving a mathematical problem
2. US a decision of a legislative body
References in classic literature ?
Setting aside their rewards and results, I want to know what they are in themselves, and how they inwardly work in the soul.
And would you not recognize a third class, such as gymnastic, and the care of the sick, and the physician's art; also the various ways of money-making--these do us good but we regard them as disagreeable; and no one would choose them for their own sakes, but only for the sake of some reward or result which flows from them?
They are the essential ingredients, not the occasional results, of the system.
All these experiments, as regards direct results, ended in failure, though their general influence was great.
To achieve these results, and to secure a note of invitation which could be shown to Lady Glyde, were the objects of my visit to Mr.
The result of the long strain was seen later in the afternoon, when he sat locked within the turret-room before the still baffling trunk, distrait, listless and yet agitated, sunk in a settled gloom.
Three days of labor with the spade and the sieve produced no results of the slightest importance.
It obeyed no known laws of physics, and overthrew the hoary axiom that like things performed to like things produce like results.
When the common soldiers are too strong and their officers too weak, the result is insubordination.
Now this was a case in which you were given the result and had to find everything else for yourself.
Wheels creak on their axles as the cogs engage one another and the revolving pulleys whirr with the rapidity of their movement, but a neighboring wheel is as quiet and motionless as though it were prepared to remain so for a hundred years; but the moment comes when the lever catches it and obeying the impulse that wheel begins to creak and joins in the common motion the result and aim of which are beyond its ken.
There is first a state of activity, consisting, with qualifications to be mentioned presently, of movements likely to have a certain result; these movements, unless interrupted, continue until the result is achieved, after which there is usually a period of comparative quiescence.