ret

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ret

[ret]
(chemistry)
The reduction or digestion of fibers (usually linen) by enzymes.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

RET.

On drawings, abbr. for return.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The ORS was measured using streak retinoscopy along the horizontal meridian (HM) (see inset in Figure 1(a)).
Retinoscopy and a computed tomography scan of the brain revealed no haemorrhages.
Comparison of the techniques of video-refraction and static retinoscopy in the measurement of refractive error in infants.
The vision exam for dogs involves eye drops, trial lenses and streak retinoscopy. A retinoscope is the device eye doctors use to shine a streak of light through the pupil of the eye, while they peer through a peephole.
Using a series of study icons and an easy-to-follow format, Lens provides the basics for understanding retinoscopy, covering optics, including the two main theories of light travel, the index of refraction and the curvature, retinoscopy, including the types of streak retinoscopes and their function, and lenses used to neutralize movement, and refractometry, including refinement techniques and instructions for patients.
After 30 minutes, cycloplegic retinoscopy and dilated fundus examination were performed.
The most common method used is a technique called Retinoscopy. By shining a light on the back of the eye (the retina) and observing which direction the reflex goes, we can determine what eyeglass lens would make a person see most clearly.
Retinoscopy, on the other hand, is a vital clinical skill which must be learned and practiced.
Cycloplegic refraction was done with Retinoscopy after one week of surgery and aphakik glasses (aspheric) were given to each eye who had bilateral or unilateral cataract surgery.
[8] Retinoscopy was done whenever required and suitable glasses were prescribed.
Forty-four chapters provide instructions for performing vision tests, retinoscopy, slit lamp microscopy, tonometry, ophthalmic photography, diagnostic imaging, ultrasound, electrophysical tests, contact lens fitting, and laser surgery.