retire


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retire

[ri′tīr]
(navigation)
To move a line of position back, parallel to itself, along a course line to obtain a line of position at an earlier time.
References in classic literature ?
After a severe struggle, in which the finest displays of personal intrepidity were exhibited by all the chiefs, the Pawnees were compelled to retire upon the open bottom, closely pressed by the Siouxes, who failed not to seize each foot of ground ceded by their enemies.
"You will say, then, to my good and faithful Parisians," continued Anne, with a smile, the expression of which did not deceive D'Artagnan, "that you have seen the king in bed, asleep, and the queen also ready to retire."
I'm 37 years old, just started my retirement plan, and need to know how much I will have when I retire, I'm saving 5% of my earnings biweekly.
A does not intend to separate from the service of, or retire from, B.
Marine who was forced to leave active duty and retire with less than 20 years of service because of combat wounds.
But people who retire early, often as the result of pressure from their employers, can be in even more serious trouble.
Haag, who wants to retire. Haag joined the company in 1993 after working at Swiss Re for 26 years.
Keep in mind, though, that you don't simply retire, and the next day all these things happen to you.
With 30 years of service, most civil servants can retire to the golf course at age 55 without penalty.
Of the 624 respondents, 190 plan to retire between 1987 and 1999.
The FASB's approach requires estimates of the total costs of providing benefits to employees after they retire. The cost would be recognized in the financial statements as an expense over the employee's service period.
KARACHI -- Mayor Wasim Akhter has directed to form a committee for payment of dues and pension to disabled and retire employees including cardiac and cancer patient and for such cases which are pending in court and at federal ombudsman.