retroactive interference


Also found in: Dictionary, Medical.
Related to retroactive interference: Retroactive inhibition, Weber's law, Proactive interference

retroactive interference

[‚re·trō‚ak·tiv ‚in·tər′fir·əns]
(psychology)
Type of interference in which information that is learned later interferes with information that was learned earlier.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
1997; Semal et al., 1996), as well as from memory processes such as retroactive interference and feature overwriting (Mercer & McKeown, 2010a, 2010b).
Table 1 lists the absolute number of children and the percentages of patients classified as medium or inferior level for the RAVLT regarding the following items: immediate memory (A1), learning (sum of A1 to A4), learning rate (A4-A1), retroactive interference (A5/ A4), long-term memory (A6), and recognition memory.
For example, stimulus salience is said to enhance encoding, whereas retroactive interference is said to produce a retrieval deficit.
The first one is the learning of new information that may compete with the information originally learned (i.e., retroactive interference; e.g., Garcia-Gutierrez & Rosas, 2003d; Pavlov, 1927).
Whether retroactive interference effects resulting from imaginary practice and physical practice are similar can be determined by examining two questions: (a) do imaginary and physical practice conditions produce comparable biasing effects on a retention test?
As with proactive and retroactive interference, coactive interference is also much influenced by the amount of material to which the learner is exposed and by the degree to which it has already been learned.
Retroactive interference also appears a rather poor fit because of its history of use in paired-associate learning.
Retroactive interference between cues trained apart has been regarded as an effect that occurs because the target and interfering associations share a common outcome.
They found that a retention interval, a context change, or the combination of these two factors after interference training led to retrieval of the original relationship between the medicine and side effect 1, attenuating retroactive interference. This study used a situation akin to Pavlovian conditioning where the dependent variable was a judgment emitted by participants.
Two experiments explored retroactive interference in human predictive learning.