retrograde amnesia


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Related to retrograde amnesia: anterograde amnesia

retrograde amnesia

[′re·trə‚grād am′nē·zha]
(medicine)
Loss of memory for events occurring prior to, but not after, the onset of a current disease or trauma.
References in periodicals archive ?
Susumu Tonegawa, the director of the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Saitama in Japan and lead author of the study said, "Our conclusion is that in retrograde amnesia, past memories may not be erased, but could simply be lost and inaccessible for recall.
In addition, imaging studies should be done for patients with a score of less than 15 on the Glasgow coma scale, retrograde amnesia for more than 30 minutes before the accident, or more than 2 episodes of vomiting.
The following terms were identified as appropriate: Searching for amnesia uncovered reports under this term, but also reports listed as transient amnesia, transient global amnesia, wandering amnesia, anterograde amnesia, dissociative amnesia and retrograde amnesia.
PTA is nearly always longer than retrograde amnesia and its duration is one of the best measures of injury severity.
Memory loss consists of posttreatment confusion and anterograde or retrograde amnesia described as follows (J.
Memory protective effect of indomethacin against electro convulsive shock induced retrograde amnesia in rats.
36) It is difficult to argue that retrograde amnesia interferes with a defendant's present ability to understand the proceedings because the amnesia is only for the period of the crime, not the current trial.
The patient showed slight paresis of the right leg, nystagmus, cognitive deficit, and retrograde amnesia.
While some doctors tell Murray that Bruce's condition is "unprecedented," Harvard's clean of psychology Daniel Schacter ponders all the possibilities from retrograde amnesia to "malingering" (not wanting to remember) to psychogenic amnesia-memory, loss due to a psychological trauma.
If it did, and you saw a slight drop in their scores when you were evaluating someone, you wouldn't know if it's just the effects of the season or a true concussion," she explained, pointing out that up to 75% of concussions are classified as mild, with no accompanying loss of consciousness or retrograde amnesia.
The athletes with headache also were more likely to have on-field retrograde amnesia (Am.