reverberant sound

reverberant sound

[ri‚vər·bə·rənt ′sau̇nd]
(acoustics)
The portion of the room impulse response consisting of sound that arrives at a listener's location more than 150 milliseconds after the first direct sound, and that has been reflected against walls and ceilings many times.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Listen to the rousing Agincourt Carol, recorded in Ascot Priory in splendidly reverberant sound, for a musical trip back in time.
Finally, the level of the measured reverberant sound pressure is far greater than the radiated sound pressure (Figure 10), resulting in an enhanced reaction force acting on the outer surface of the decoupling layer, which suppressed the vibrations of the base plate according to (1).
These test methods have continuously provided accurate baseline data for predicting the resultant room sound measurements from the rated unit sound power as measured in a reverberant sound chamber.
The coefficient of reverberant sound absorption shows the efficiency of controlling the field of reverberant sound in enclosed spaces (LST EN ISO 354:2006).
(1) Cherished by local supporters, the vuvuzela produces a characteristically loud, reverberant sound that can be heard for miles around the stadium.
Caedmon's highly reverberant sound contrasted with the intimate, dead sound of the postwar spoken word industry.
Within the incubator, there are two distinct sound fields that exist simultaneously: direct and reverberant sound. Direct sound is caused by the neonate or equipment necessary to provide neonatal care.
I will recount several models for the listening experience in an attempt to redeem the virtues of reverb, in order to take seriously the pleasures that many listeners persisted in finding in reverberant sound, despite its status as impure distortion.
New guitarist Femi Temowo is blessed with a spangled, reverberant sound to begin with, which is even further dispersed in this airy environment.
The result is a rather reverberant sound that does not provide as much inner detail as, say, the aforementioned Mercury recording, which is in a class by itself sonically and interpretively.
Correctly locating a microphone for the best blend can be a time-consuming job, because the unit must be placed in that part of the direct field that most closely simulates the reverberant sound encountered at a live concert.