reversed image

reversed image

[ri′vərst ′im·ij]
(graphic arts)
A mirror image in which the right and left sides of the picture are interchanged.
(optics)
References in periodicals archive ?
The design is inspired by a reversed image of Hong Kong's Victoria Harbour.
Using a marker, trace the outline on the back side of the paper to get a reversed image. Use this reversed image to create your applique.
Turza understands that "the quiet" could be an uncanny quiet, and many of these poems encounter this kind of jarring, "dark side of the moon" reality, like a shadow self or a return of the repressed, a reversed image.
Depending on circumstances, I'll also bring my dominant hand down diagonally at waist level--sort of a reversed image of my other arm.
The execution of the volume itself is unusually fine and carefully conceived, with the type of some headings set upside down to mimic the reversed image of the camera obscura, a "pinhole" through the front cover, and a wealth of color photos of the project as well as concluding, fold-out plates of the finished photo in its positive and negative forms.
The 14 feet shroud bears the reversed image of a crucified man complete with blood seeping out of wounded writs and feet, which many believe to be Christ's image.
even the print is a reversed image. * How's that for excitement (and the need for prior planning)?
adopts the category of "virtuoso religion" where "the defining character of virtuoso religion is its ability to maintain alternative structures that present a reversed image of society whilst remaining within its ]society's] ideological and institutional structures" (205).
The film was a three-part OPP laminated, with the hologram surface on the inner pack, but as the outer layer was a clear OPP the reversed image was also visible on the outside of the pack.
Similarly, Mostafa Lacheraf's colonial Algeria is the reversed image of the Algeria of the French colonial historians, with negatives revalorized as positive.(13) Libyan history works much the same way: compare Enrico de Leone's La Colonizzatione del Africa del Nord, with its image of a benevolent Italian colonialism whose mission was to bring progress to a benighted Libya, and Ruth First's nationalist version, which serves as an appropriate antidote.(14)
By studying a reversed image of the picture Bateman often picks up details he might have otherwise missed.