reversible chemical reaction

reversible chemical reaction

[ri′vər·sə·bəl ′kem·ə·kəl rē′ak·shən]
(chemistry)
A chemical reaction that can be made to proceed in either direction by suitable variations in the temperature, volume, pressure, or quantities of reactants or products.
References in periodicals archive ?
"What we've done is thrown a special salt into water, dropped in an electrode, and created a reversible chemical reaction that stores electrons in the form of hydrogen gas," Cui said.
(i) It highlights the fact that though initially there was a very limited volume of water in the growth chamber, the reversible chemical reaction between [H.sub.2]O and Mo[O.sub.3] ensures that water vapor is continuously present near the growth substrates and protects source from poisoning.
The role of water pretreatment of the growth substrates is explained based on a reversible chemical reaction. This reaction has previously been reported to explain the role of a continuous flow of water vapor during the growth process [27].
A single or a multiple steps reversible chemical reaction can be usually represented as:
These nano energy packs may contain materials hitherto unknown but would store the energy through reversible chemical reaction or maybe electrical reactions and when brought back to earth can deliver energy per kilogram of payload touching several hundreds of watt hours," he added.
A buffer is a substance undergoes a reversible chemical reaction that resists and thusly minimizes any pH change when mixed with an acid.
Sunscreens frequently function by absorbing UV light and using the energy to trigger a reversible chemical reaction, such that ultimately the energy is dissipated with no lasting chemical consequences.
Liquid crystal smart windows are limited by high costs, high haze levels, and the inability to effectively block or even control light Electrochromic windows, which require a reversible chemical reaction to take place within the window and are still under development, are reportedly sensitive to temperature changes and power surges; do not change uniformly over the area of the window; have slow response times (a normal casement-size electrochromic window can take 10 minutes to change and will get even slower as the size of the window increases or the temperature gets colder); and are expected to be very expensive.
Thus, for example, microscopic processes in the interior of the electrochemical cells (batteries), loading phenomena at interfaces and processes of electrolyte-solid interfaces at the reversible chemical reactions, such as lithiation, with reference to the characteristic changes associated with such.
Advances are being made in energy storage systems such as lead acid batteries, supercapacitors and reversible chemical reactions.
The Sandia team is investigating a technique, called thermochemical energy transport, that involves the use of reversible chemical reactions. These catalyst-driven reactions "trap" heat at its source and later release it at its destination.

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