revolving door


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Related to revolving door: Revolving door syndrome

revolving door

[ri′välv·iŋ ′dȯr]
(building construction)
A door consisting of four leaves that revolve together on a central vertical axis within a circular vestibule.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

revolving door

An exterior entrance door consisting of four leaves at right angles to each other, set in the form of a cross, which pivot about a vertical axis within a cylindrical-shaped vestibule
See also: Dutch door
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

revolving door

revolving door: plan
An exterior door consisting of four leaves (at 90° to each other) which pivot about a common vertical axis within a cylindrically shaped vestibule; prevents the direct passage of air through the vestibule, thereby eliminating drafts from outside.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
"People who will fight for every single promise Hillary Clinton has put forward during this campaign -including her promise to end the revolving door between Wall Street and Washington."
Average daily cost of energy due to air leakage at MIT was $13.10 during the winter, but a 75% usage rate of revolving doors drops the cost to $7.66 while 100% usage would drop it to $2.83.
On numerous occasions, myself and other passengers have been delayed in exiting the baggage area because the revolving doors have been stuck.
While this apparent contradiction seems more like a Zen riddle than a building component trait, the dual nature of a revolving door makes it attractive to building managers and designers who need to blend access (always open and security (always closed).
"But, more importantly, we have to give a guaranteed period of work so that we can end the revolving door syndrome."
On plan, their facades, which are 19m long, converge on the centre of a small circus and turning the corner terminate in a slender frameless revolving door set along the curve of the circle.
So POGO created its own database, listing more than 380 former government officials and high ranking officers who have passed through the so-called "revolving door" over the past 10 years and snagged lucrative jobs with defense contractors--many joining the private sector before the end of the so-called one- to two-year "cooling off' period.
Labour's Jon Trickett is correct about Clegg and the "revolving door" between politics and big business.
"The revolving door -- the pattern of people going from industry to agency, back to industry -- that will be closed in the Obama White House," Obama said on the campaign trail in 2007.
"It just feels like a revolving door at the club and that needs to stop somewhere.
And whilst admitting his task is more complex than he first thought, the Scot insists the Black Cats' problems can be overcome, has vowed to remain "open and honest" despite criticism of being too pessimistic, and has called for patience from supporters and for the club's "revolving door" to be replaced by a "period of stability or identity".
In the world of state government, when a legislator or other senior government official leaves his or her public-servant post and returns immediately to the statehouse as a lobbyist, he or she has effectively gone through a "revolving door." Clever name, yes; but also an ethical minefield.