revolving door

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revolving door

[ri′välv·iŋ ′dȯr]
(building construction)
A door consisting of four leaves that revolve together on a central vertical axis within a circular vestibule.

revolving door

An exterior entrance door consisting of four leaves at right angles to each other, set in the form of a cross, which pivot about a vertical axis within a cylindrical-shaped vestibule
See also: Dutch door

revolving door

revolving door: plan
An exterior door consisting of four leaves (at 90° to each other) which pivot about a common vertical axis within a cylindrically shaped vestibule; prevents the direct passage of air through the vestibule, thereby eliminating drafts from outside.
References in periodicals archive ?
The introduction of the Besam RD100 the new manually initiated revolving door with power assist provides an excellent, energy-saving option within the Besam revolving door range.
But even with the insights offered by the human-capital theory, the prevailing analyses of the revolving door are still incomplete.
In fact, I am actually reckless when it comes to revolving doors, flinging myself into fast-moving compartments in an attempt to demonstrate my testosterone levels.
It was unexpected, and I was already discombobulated by my previous failure to leave the revolving door, and, basically, the speed made me miss my exit.
Thus, two revolving doors at one building could save almost $7,500 yearly in natural gas used to heat and cool, amounting to nearly 15 tons of CO2 emissions.
And one day last week, I, along with my fellow users, achieved revolving door nirvana.
When we apply our research findings to program transformation, we find organizations and systems getting stuck just like the people that get stuck in the revolving doors of our services.
When I arrived at the baggage carousel, there was already another plane load of people standing at the revolving door waiting for it to turn.
There are currently no safety regulations under Japan's building code regarding automatic revolving doors because they have only been introduced in recent years and there had not been any reports of fatal accidents, according to the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport.
A simple and tremendous energy saver is the use of revolving doors, which keep the outside and inside environments separated and lose the least amount of air as compared to swinging and sliding doors.
The stairway in a first-floor kiosk would be gutted to accommodate the equipment, and three exit-only revolving doors will be installed.
Spokeswoman Karen Marshall said customers found the revolving doors "irritating" because they kept stopping and starting due to a safety device which prevents people getting too close to the glass.