revulsion


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revulsion

Obsolete the diversion of disease or congestion from one part of the body to another by cupping, counterirritants, etc.
References in classic literature ?
His misery vanished, his feelings underwent a tremendous revulsion.
Before a caress has had time to cool, a strenuous revulsion seizes me: I long to return to my old lonely ascetic hermit life; to my dry books; my Socialist propagandism; my voyage of discovery through the wilderness of thought.
At this point there was a revulsion in my heart too.
Had the apples of Sodom turned to ashes in my mouth, I could not have felt a more startling revulsion.
We sat down together, there on the grass, and the revulsion of feeling was so great that really I think we cried with joy.
Otter with her respectability, Ruth Chalice with her affectations, Lawson and Clutton with their quarrels; he felt a revulsion from them all.
I sketched my first contacts with alcohol, told of my first intoxications and revulsions, and pointed out always the one thing that in the end had won me over--namely, the accessibility of alcohol.
On the contrary, party chiefs' ridicule of and allegations against each other reveal their revulsion of each other a trait that is the polar opposite to what a true leader is supposed to possess.
Maybe it is because of a revulsion on some people's part to President Barack Obama and his personal stylea revulsion not only because Obama is black but also because he is professorial and cerebral, unlike, say, his predecessor, George W.
Summing up in the trial of the sacked [euro]12million Sunderland winger, Judge Jonathan Rose told the four men and eight women jurors at Bradford crown court: "Sympathy is not evidence, nor are feelings of disgust or revulsion.
Summary: Syrian President Bashar Assad delegated a high-ranking Baath Party official to visit the victims of a double bombing attack in the city of Homs that killed 50 children and sparked widespread revulsion and outrage at the authorities.
Presuming an incomprehensible cultural gulf with no psychological knowledge of its executioners, David Brooks suggests the Islamic State lacks our civilized sense of revulsion (Sept.