Rhetorician

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Rhetorician

 

(rhetor). (1) In ancient Greece and Rome, an orator, especially one whose oratory was not so much practical as for show. Rhetoricians included teachers and students at schools of rhetoric.

(2) In Russia in the 18th and 19th centuries, a pupil in the third of five classes at a religious seminary. The five classes were infimum (that is, primary grade), grammar, rhetoric, philosophy, and theology.

References in periodicals archive ?
2) to republican rhetoricians in Florence (supplemented by jurists), and from them back to Quintilian and to Cicero's rhetorical dialogues.
The article shows that the feminine and maternal are inscribed into rhetorical categories such as figure, simile and catachresis that are shunned, demeaned or abjected (1) by the rhetoricians, but that as abjected categories do not cease to challenge and fascinate the system that produces and abjects them (Kristeva, Powers of Horror 2, 4).
The notion of appropriateness - the relation of speech acts to particular contexts in time - has also been the explicit province of rhetoricians since the sophists.
Byrhtferth's Manual is shown to have an interesting section on figures, and whether he can be regarded as a rhetorician is discussed in the light of opposing views on the matter.
That is to say, for Quintilian and other classical rhetoricians, no use of rhetoric was considered beautiful or successful if it failed to move its audience in the desired fashion, thus ensuring that the narration of facts assumed at least as much importance as the truth content of those facts.
Through her observational analysis of how the sounds and noises of physiological monitors disrupt and otherwise shape the care of infants by speaking and standing in for their bodies--a phenomenon she calls "rhetorical ventriloquism"--Bivens enriches our understanding of the sensorial dimensions of clinical caretaking She calls on rhetoricians of health and medicine to be "earwitnesses" to sonic and aural experiences in clinical research settings, extending her previously published book chapter's ethical consideration of the rhetorician's embodied attunement and responsiveness in research (Bivens, 2018).
His citations range from ancient Greek rhetoricians to 21st century writers; from English, German, and French stylists of previous centuries to contemporary American lawyers.
As comparative rhetoricians we commit ourselves to dialogism, where the act of comparing changes both the self and the texts that are being compared.
Here too is language, especially analogy and metaphor, as used by poets, rhetoricians, politicians, and historians.
Part III Acting: Ruzante and the evolution of acting practice in Renaissance Italy, Ronnie Ferguson; Arte dialogue structures in the comedies of Moliere, Richard Andrews; Rogues and rhetoricians: acting styles in early English drama, Peter Thomson; Rehearsal, performance and plays, Tiffany Stern; Comic stage routines in Guarinonius' medical treatise of 1610, M.
Among their topics are pruning the tree of virtue in Shakespeare's Titus Andronicus, Howard Barker's refashioning of Hamlet's mother, the emblematic owl in early English culture, scenes of detection in the anonymous Elizabethan Tragedy of Master Arden of Faversham (1592), Edward II and the rhetoricians of myth, Marlowe's early tragedies, death and the pre-reformation London elite, and irony and transcendence on the Renaissance stage.
Descartes's famous early unpublished declaration 'larvatus prodeo' shows his intention to dissimulate and his commitment to worldly prudence; Francis Bacon, Baltasar Gracian, and Tommaso Accetto are early modern writers on these topics who are used intertextually by Hallyn to structure his investigations, together with ancient rhetoricians, notably Hermogenes and Quintilian.