rhubarb

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rhubarb:

see buckwheatbuckwheat,
common name for certain members of the Polygonaceae, a family of herbs and shrubs found chiefly in north temperate areas and having a characteristic pungent juice containing oxalic acid. Species native to the United States are most common in the West.
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rhubarb

rhubarb

Eat only the top half of the stem, not the leaf, root or bottom of the stem. The leaf is poisonous.Very good for cleaning out the intestinal tract. Very sour, super tart. Rhubarb contains pectin which is a preservative, so if you add rhubarb to food you are cooking (if you cook your food), the food will not spoil. Produces 2 crops in the year, just before cherries and strawberries in the spring, so you can use it to preserve the fruit, and then again in the fall to help preserve the apples, pears etc. Rhubarb has greenish white or rose reddish clumpy flower clusters. Leaves sometimes confused with burdock, which has “velcro” balls and purplish red spiky flowers. Small amounts of rhubarb root are used as a laxative, but the stem is safer because the compounds are not as concentrated Experiments have shown rhubarb root to lower blood glucose levels in diabetic mice. The stem can be dried and powdered also.

What does it mean when you dream about rhubarb?

The bitter rhubarb plant, which takes on a sweet flavor when cooked with sugar, is a symbol of taking the good (sweet) with the bad (bitter). Because it is often used as a purgative, it can also represent freeing oneself of something unwanted.

rhubarb

[′rü‚bärb]
(botany)
Rheum rhaponticum. A herbaceous perennial of the order Polygoniales grown for its thick, edible petioles.

rhubarb

symbol of approaching pitfalls. [Flower Symbolism: Flora Symbolica, 177]
See: Danger

rhubarb

1. any of several temperate and subtropical plants of the polygonaceous genus Rheum, esp R. rhaponticum (common garden rhubarb), which has long green and red acid-tasting edible leafstalks, usually eaten sweetened and cooked
2. the leafstalks of this plant
3. a related plant, Rheum officinale, of central Asia, having a bitter-tasting underground stem that can be dried and used medicinally as a laxative or astringent
References in periodicals archive ?
Rhubarb requires a cold season to flourish; it likes a winter where the temperatures go to at least 40 degrees or below (it needs this to break dormancy), making it an ideal choice for northern climates.
Rhubarb is best started from root divisions or by cutting crowns and dividing them, making sure that each division has a piece of crown, of bud, and root enough to grow.
It is important to keep rhubarb free of weeds and to keep the seed stalks cut back.
Much of the rhubarb we buy at market is field grown, however, there is also quite a bit of hothouse-grown rhubarb.
1 To store fresh rhubarb, place it in a plastic bag, unsealed, and refrigerate for two weeks; it is best used as soon as possible.
2 Although rhubarb is easily frozen, it also can be canned in sugar syrup--check a good canning guide for amounts and processing time.
3 Rhubarb contains vitamins A and C, potassium and calcium.
4 If rhubarb is old or fibrous, remove some of the strings.
5 Preserve rhubarb by cutting the stalks into 1/2- to 1-inch pieces.
6 The flavor of rhubarb pairs nicely with strawberries, oranges, apples and ginger.
Add rhubarb and cook for about 10 minutes until soft.