rhymester


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rhymester

, rimester, rhymer, rimer
a poet, esp one considered to be mediocre or mechanical in diction; poetaster or versifier
References in periodicals archive ?
So, with some interest, he read that the popular Mersey Sound rhymester, Roger McGough, these days seen in his full dome-headed glory, is to donate a pair of Paul
The lecture about the Meltham-born rhymester was the highlight of the 5th Pennine Cricket History Conference at the University of Huddersfield.
After departing from Lisa, Minuccio seeks out an individual whom he knows to be skilled with verse, in order to write the text, which will communicate the young girl's feelings to King Peter: Minuccio left and went in search of one Mico da Siena, who in those days was considered quite a good rhymester, and with entreaties, he convinced him to compose the following canzonetta: Arise, my Love, and go to see my lord, and tell him of the torments I am suffering, and tell him I am close to death, for I must hide my yearning out of fear.
Stella has poured out her problems into her first book of poems, called Reflections Of A Rhymester which has led to her being dubbed 'the Lily Allen of poetry'.
So, while I did poke my nose into the log cabin where Service lived and wrote, I did not bother to learn much about the old rhymester, who reminded me, in his later photos, of a white-haired Charlie Chaplin.
Abigail Adams is an "ur-WASP." Thomas Jefferson: "photogenic" and "the model student, the first on a Junior Year Abroad." Henry Wadsworth Longfellow: a "doggerel rhymester." Hemingway, Pound, and Stein: the "Tinker, Evers, and Chance of the American Experience in Paris."
Racing's newest rhymester is none other than an associate of Sangster for 40 years, BHB director and Industry Committee chairman Rhydian Morgan-Jones.
In Much Ado About Nothing, on the other hand, prose stands for plain sense, 'verse for hyperbole, ornament; Benedicky is an inept rhymester, but his love for Beatrice and hers for him has a chance to endure because it is founded not on the fantastical language of romantic courtship but on the sallies and scorn of prose wit.
(174) Joseph Haines was a notorious scapegrace actor and sometime rhymester, but why Gould should be hitting at who almost certainly must be Sir Robert Howard is hard to see: Howard had not staged a new play since 1668, and though The Committee (1662) remained popular into the eighteenth century, it is a cheerful city comedy, not a smutty one.
Joyce has the young Stephen Dedalus pressed against a barbed-wire fence by a gang of his classmates, dunces and idlers whom Stephen has just informed that "the greatest poet" is not that "rhymester" Alfred Lord Tennyson but Lord Byron, who in their view (one shared by much of Europe) was "a heretic," "immoral," and "a bad man." It is a wonderful Joycean moment, and not only because Byron himself had so often been put against the fence by his philistine countrymen: St.
These misplaced terms offend my disposition and occur only to the mind of a novice rhymester, who calls on Apollo for inspiration; for my part, I renounce him, and know nothing at all except my nature.] By now we are familiar with this way of talking.
Paul Bettany (below) - chillingly brilliant in Gangster No 1 - is enigmatic and scurrilous as the original hack rhymester, who is portrayed as a dead beat gambler.