riblet


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riblet

[′rib·lət]
(design engineering)
Any of the small, longitudinal striations, with spacing on the order of 0.002 inch or 50 micrometers, that are made on the surfaces of ships or aircraft to reduce the drag of turbulent flow.
References in periodicals archive ?
It allows riblet geometries to be adjusted depending on their location on the aircraft.
Sharks are famed for their speed through the water, but rather than being smooth, sharkskin is covered in small, tooth-like riblets.
Crosby Mr Riblet would have approved: he had seven wives in his time, his last one being 32 years younger than him!
Dean and Bhushan [13] applied the riblet structure to a rectangular pipe and found a maximum drag reduction rate of 10%.
In fact, the term of superdirectivity was used by Taylor in 1948 [28], with reference to the work of Riblet dealing with the maximum directivity of antennas [29].
24 April 2013: Lauren Agresti, Panarat Anamwathana, Rebecca Chalsen, Ariel Cohen, Rachel Easterbrook, Leila Ehsan, Gabriel Fineberg, Rachel Finkel, Daniel Friend, Ellen Frierson, Stephanie Golob, Ross Guilder, Kayla Kapito, Julia Kelsoe, Danielle Kerker, Elizabeth Kobert, Cole Kosydar, Benjamin Lushing, Elise Mitchell, Allison Perelman, Steven Perez, Lucie Read, Jesse Reich, Sarah Riblet, Daniel Sawey, Sarah Schelde, Gregory Segal, Elizabeth Slivjak, Aaron Smallberg, Stephen Todres, Carolyn Vinnicombe, Sarah Zimmerman.
Furthermore, to improve fuel efficiency in flight, Lufthansa is testing new aircraft paint with a sharkskin-inspired riblet texture on two Airbus A340-300s.
The park boasts mock Italian sausage, vegan riblet sandwiches, and a vegetarian sushi platter.
Numerical simulation research about riblet surface with different spacing.
Arbor Crest Wine Cellars also marked its 25th anniversary in 2007, but its location has been a local landmark since 1924, when an eccentric inventor named Royal Riblet built a Florentine-style stone mansion atop a 450-foot basalt cliff above the Spokane River.
(5.) Riblet writes: "These second half action sequences often involved cross-cutting between up to four or five lines of action.