rigid airship


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rigid airship

A type of dirigible that has a rigid framework to maintain its shape at all times. See airship.
References in periodicals archive ?
Aeros, a new variety of rigid airship, has begun "float testing" inside a California hangar ...
The R101 rigid airship was built in the late 1920s as Britain's answer to the German zeppelin and housed in a massive shed near Bedford.
Shenandoah spent her first year flying around the eastern United States, giving the American people a look at the rigid airship and providing training for her crew.
The only airman in his time qualified to pilot a free balloon, a blimp, a glider, and an airplane, as well as to command a rigid airship; Settle was also the first American to fly a pressurized cabin into the stratosphere.
It was the German Luftschiff Zeppelin 59 (LZ 59), a rigid airship. During the flight most of the weight of the ship was held aloft by buoyant lift, the difference in weight between the air displaced by its gas envelope and the hydrogen contained within.
The well-publicized crash would effectively end the use of rigid airship for commercial travel, but the Navy's interest in the airships did not vanish completely in the flames.
This modern instance of competition between international joint ventures recalls the circumstances more than fifty years ago when rigid airship (or dirigible) construction was in the vanguard of airborne materials technology, and when the efforts to build dirigibles in Germany, England, and the United States inaugurated the use of high-strength aluminum as the dominant structural material in aircraft.
A rigid airship (or "dirigible") has an internal framework as exemplified by the German airships Graf Zeppelin and Hindenberg.
By construction type, the market has been categorized into rigid airships, semi rigid airships and non-rigid airships.
Bennett covers the technological underpinnings of the German ascendency in rigid airships and the British response for homeland security, as the UK was "No longer an Island." The geo-political struggle, both in England and Germany, is covered not only with an excellent analysis but also with the brilliant use of contemporary political cartoons, which are a stroke of genius for the reader's benefit.
This was the fate of 11 British rigid airships, not to mention America's Los Angeles and Germany's two Graf Zeppelins.